5 Ways To Ease Lower Back Pain

5 Ways To Ease Lower Back Pain

lower back pain Most lower back pain is the result of an injury, such as muscle sprains or strains due to sudden movements or poor body mechanics while lifting heavy objects. But lower back pain can also be caused by certain diseases, such as cancer of the spinal cord, ruptured or herniated disc, sciatica, arthritis, kidney infections or infections of the spine. Acute back pain can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, while chronic back pain is pain that lasts longer than three months.

Lower back pain is more likely to occur in individuals between the ages of 30 and 50. This is partly due to the changes that occur in the body with aging. As you grow older, the fluid content between the vertebrae in the spine becomes reduced, which means discs in the spine are more easily irritated. Some muscle tone is also lost, which makes the back more prone to injury. This is why strengthening your back muscles and using good body mechanics and exercises are helpful in preventing lower back pain.

Why So Painful?

So why is the lower back a target area for pain? Generally speaking, the lower back is subject to a lot of mechanical lower back painstress and strain. The reason is the weight of the upper body, which always puts loads on the lower back.

Supporting all that upper body weight is the spine, which is made up of more than 30 small bones called vertebrae stacked one on top of the other. A spongy piece of cartilage, called a disc, sits between each vertebra. It acts as a shock absorber, preventing the bony vertebrae from grinding against one another.

With age, these cushioning discs gradually wear away and shrink, a condition known as degenerative disc disease. Discs can also tear or become injured. Sometimes the weakening of a disc can put pressure on its jelly-like center, as similar to a bubble forming on your car’s tire. You hit a bump in the road, then all of a sudden that tire goes pop. In the lower back paincase of your back, that pressure can lead to a herniated disc (also called a “slipped disc” or “ruptured disc”), in which the center of the disc bulges. Sometimes that bulging causes the material from inside the disc to press on the sensitive nerves that carry messages to the brain. The result can be the kind of excruciating pain. A herniated disc in the lower back can put pressure on the nerve that extends down the spinal column. This commonly causes pain to radiate to the buttocks and all the way down the leg. This condition is called sciatica.

Here Are 5 Ways to Ease Lower Back Pain

If you sit in an uncomfortable chair all day, work a jackhammer or regularly twist your body into uncomfortable positions, your lower back will suffer for it. Smoking — the bad habit that increases the risk of dozens of diseases — can also lead to backaches. One study found that smokers are nearly a third more likely to have lower back pain compared to nonsmokers.

Try these five ways to prevent or ease lower back pain

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If you smoke, get help to kick the habit.

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Practice good posture whenever you sit or stand. When lifting something, lift with your knees, not with your back.

lower back pain

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Do exercises to strengthen the muscles that support your back — especially the abdominals, hips, back, and pelvic area. Developing strong core muscles can make a big difference in how you feel.

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Fight the urge to crawl into bed whenever your lower back acts up. “Our bodies are meant to be used so If you have pain, the first thing you do is lay down, but that can actually make it worse. It’s best to stay active and try to apply the appropriate exercises. We recommend Doctors Pain Relief Systems.

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If your back pain get to severe see your doctor and get treated for lower back pain early on, so you can stay moving and keep active.

Ebola Facts, Symptoms and Prevention

Ebola Facts, Symptoms and Prevention

Ebola

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Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a severe and often fatal illness in humans. The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. The average EVD case fatality rate is around 50%. Case fatality rates have varied from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks. The first EVD outbreaks occurred in remote villages in Central Africa, near tropical rainforests but the most recent outbreak in west Africa has involved major urban as well as rural areas. Community engagement is key to successfully controlling outbreaks. Good outbreak control relies on applying a package of interventions, namely case management, surveillance and contact tracing, a good laboratory service, safe burials and social mobilization. Early supportive care with rehydration, symptomatic treatment improves survival. There is as yet no licensed treatment proven to neutralize the virus but a range of blood, immunological and drug therapies are under development. There are currently no licensed Ebola vaccines but 2 potential candidates are undergoing evaluation.  

Ebola Symptoms and Diagnosis

Ebola is rare but is very deadly, it causes bleeding inside and outside the body. As the virus spreads through the body, it damages the immune system and organs. Ultimately, it causes levels of blood-clotting cells to drop. This leads to severe, uncontrollable bleeding. The disease, also known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever or Ebola virus, kills up to 90% of people who are infected.

Ebola

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Symptoms start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus, with a fever, sore throat, joint and muscle pain and headaches, weakness, stomach pain and lack of appetite. Ebola can feel like the flu or other illnesses. Symptoms show up 2 to 21 days after infection. As the disease gets worse, it causes bleeding inside the body, as well as from the eyes, ears and nose. Some people will vomit or cough up blood, have bloody diarrhea and get a rash along with decreased functioning of the liver and kidneys. The virus may be acquired upon contact with blood or bodily fluids of an infected animal. Spreading through the air has not been documented in the natural environment. Fruit bats are believed to be a carrier and may spread the virus without being affected. Once human infection occurs, the disease may spread between people, as well. Male survivors may be able to transmit the disease via semen for nearly two months. To make the diagnosis, typically other diseases with similar symptoms such as malaria, cholera and other viral hemorrhagic fevers are first excluded. To confirm the diagnosis, blood samples are tested for viral antibodies, viral RNA or the virus itself. There is no FDA-approved vaccine available for Ebola. But they will not give up trying to find a vaccine to protect people from getting this horrible and fatal disease. Scientists are working on a variety of vaccines that would protect people from Ebola or Marburg viruses. Some of the results have been promising, but further testing is needed. It is hoped that one will be available by November of 2014.

Will Ebola Reach the USA

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The 2014 Ebola outbreak is one of the largest Ebola outbreaks in history and the first in West Africa. It’s affecting five countries in West Africa. The outbreak does not pose a significant risk to the United States. The CDC says there’s no significant risk of Ebola in the United States.  It has strong safety measures in place for people who have Ebola and are brought to the U.S. for treatment. Ebola can spread from country to country when people travel. So it is possible for it to reach the U.S. if an infected person travels here. But there are ways to prevent people from coming to U.S. airports with the disease. Airline crews are trained to spot the symptoms of Ebola in passengers flying from places where the virus is found. Crews are told to quarantine anyone who looks infected.

How to Protect Yourself from the Ebola Virus

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Prevention focuses on avoiding contact with the viruses. The following precautions can help prevent infection and spread of Ebola and Marburg. If you travel to or are in an area affected by an Ebola outbreak, make sure to do the following to protect yourself and loved ones.

  • Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids. Wash your hands frequently. As with other infectious diseases, one of the most important preventive measures is frequent hand-washing. Use soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs containing at least 60 percent alcohol when soap and water aren’t available. Take hand sanitizer everywhere with you, give it to your kids and let them know why.
  • Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
  • Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
  • Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids and raw meat prepared from these animals. Like Bush Meat so be sure to Avoid bush meat. In developing countries, avoid buying or eating the wild animals, including nonhuman primates, sold in local markets.
  • Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.
  • After you return, monitor your health for 21 days and seek medical care immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola.
  • Avoid areas of known outbreaks. Before traveling to Africa, find out about current epidemics by checking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. 

If there would become a Ebola outbreak in the United States, my advice to you is to wear a mouth cover mask. Always wear gloves or pack hand sanitizer and try to avoid contact with others, and even wear the appropriate clothing that covers and have no skin exposing. You can become infected just by touching an infected human and even animal by their sweat. Even if the outbreak is not reported to be in your area always take precautionary measures to protect you and your family. I would even go as far as home schooling your children just to be safe. School is the one place where kids come in contact with others and items. You always want to be safe to protect yourself and your loved ones. Especially when it comes to a disease as aggressive as Ebola. There’s no cure for this disease. If you have Ebola, you’ll be isolated from the public immediately to prevent the spread. The Ebola virus kills up to 90% of people who are infected. So you do whatever you need to protect your family if their would ever become an outbreak in the US, which scientists say is unlikely but you can never be to sure. Always be prepared and have a plan.  

Home Remedies for Kidney Stones

Home Remedies for Kidney Stones

home remedies for kidney stonesKidney stones (renal lithiasis) are small “pebbles” of acid salt and minerals that form in the kidneys. The most common symptom is severe pain. Most stones pass on their own but medical procedures may be used to remove some kidney stones. Kidney stones have many causes and can affect any part of your urinary tract — from your kidneys to your bladder. Often, stones form when the urine becomes concentrated, allowing minerals to crystallize and stick together. Passing kidney stones can be extremely painful, the stones usually don’t cause any permanent damage. Depending on your situation, you may need nothing more than to take pain medication and drink lots of water to pass a kidney stone. In other instances, surgery may be needed. Your doctor may recommend preventive treatment to reduce your risk of recurrent kidney stones if you’re at increased risk of developing them again. A variety of minerals and chemicals are excreted in the urine and sometimes these combine to form the beginning of a stone. Over time, this can grow from an invisible speck of sand into a stone that can be an inch in diameter or larger.

There are different terms for kidney stones depending upon where they are located within the urinary tract:home remedies for kidney stones

  • Urolith: A stone anywhere within the urinary tract                               
  • Ureterolith: A stone within the ureter
  • Calculus: A stone within the body
  • Nephrolith: A stone within the kidney

Anyone can get a kidney stone, but some people are more likely to get one. Men are affected more often than women and kidney stones are more common in non-Hispanic white people than in non-Hispanic black people and Mexican Americans. Overweight and obese people are more likely to get a kidney stone than people of normal weight. In the United States, 8.8 percent of the population or one in 11 people, have had a kidney stone.

Kidney stones can form when substances in the urine—such as calcium, oxalate, and phosphorus—become highly concentrated. Certain foods may promote stone formation in people who are susceptible, but scientists do not believe that eating any specific food causes stones to form in people who are not susceptible. People who do not drink enough fluids may also be at higher risk, as their urine is more concentrated.

Causes of Kidney Stones

People who are at increased risk of kidney stones are those with

  • a family history of kidney stones
  • cystic kidney diseases, which are disorders that cause fluid-filled sacs to form on the kidneys
  • hyperparathyroidism, a condition in which the parathyroid glands, which are four pea-sized glands located in the neck, release too much hormone, causing extra calcium in the blood
  • cystinuria, a condition in which urine contains high levels of the amino acid cystine
  • renal tubular acidosis, a disease that occurs when the kidneys fail to excrete acids into the urine, which causes a person’s blood to remain too acidic
  • hypercalciuria, a condition that runs in families in which urine contains unusually large amounts of calcium; this is the most common condition found in those who form calcium stones
  • hyperoxaluria, a condition in which urine contains unusually large amounts of oxalate
  • hyperuricosuria, a disorder of uric acid metabolism
  • chronic inflammation of the bowel
  • a history of gastrointestinal (GI) tract surgery
  • blockage of the urinary tract
  • gout, a disorder that causes painful swelling of the joints

Other increased risk factors of kidney stones are people taking certain medications including

  • calcium-based antacids
  • diuretics—medications that help the kidneys remove fluid from the body
  • the anti-seizure medication topiramate (Topamax)
  • the protease inhibitor indinavir (Crixivan), a medication used to treat HIV infection

There is a genetic component as well, and stone formers run in families, especially when it comes to difficulties metabolizing chemicals like cysteine, oxalate, and uric acid.

Common Symptoms of Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. Each year in the United States, people makehome remedies for kidney stones more than a million visits to health care providers and more than 300,000 people go to emergency rooms for kidney stone problems. When kidney stones move through the urinary tract, they may cause

  • Severe pain in the side and back, belly or groin
  • Pain that comes in waves and fluctuates in intensity
  • Frequent or painful urination
  • Blood in the urine
  • Cloudy or foul-smelling urine
  • Nausea and vomiting and at times dizziness, to where you may feel like your going to pass out.

Pain caused by a kidney stone may change, shifting to a different location or increasing in intensity as the stone moves through your urinary tract. Some small stones may pass without causing any symptoms.

Seek immediate medical attention if you experience:

  • Pain so severe that you can’t sit still or find a comfortable position
  • Pain accompanied by fever and chills
  • Pain accompanied by nausea and vomiting
  • Blood in your urine
  • Difficulty passing urine

How to prevent Kidney Stones

Preventative measures depend on the type of stones. In those with calcium stones, drinking lots of fluids, thiazide diuretics and citrate are effective as is allopurinal in those with high uric acid levels in the blood or urine.

Current dietary recommendations to minimize the formation of kidney stones include.

  • Increasing total fluid intake, with the objective of increasing urine output to more than two liters per day
  • Increasing intake of citrate-rich drinks such as lemonade and orange juice
  • Attempt to maintain a calcium intake of 1,000–1,200 mg (1.0–1.2 g) per day
  • Limiting sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg (2.3 g) per day
  • Limiting vitamin C intake to less than 1,000 mg (1.0 g) per day
  • Limiting animal protein intake to no more than two meals daily, with less than 170–230 g (6.0–8.1 oz) per day. (An association between animal protein consumption and recurrence of kidney stones has been shown in men.
  • Limiting consumption of soft drinks which contain phosphoric acid to flavor the soft drink, to less than one liter of soft drink per week.

Maintenance of dilute urine by means of vigorous fluid therapy is beneficial in all forms of nephrolithiasis, so increasing urine volume is a key principle for the prevention of kidney stones. Fluid intake should be sufficient to maintain a urine output of at least 2 litres (68 US fl oz) per day. A high fluid intake has been associated with a 40% reduction in recurrence risk.

The kidneys are one of the most important organs in the human body. They help detox and filter impurities from the blood, as well as waste products from your urine. Kidney stones form when the kidneys are not able to process toxins efficiently. Specifically, a crystallization of unprocessed minerals builds up. Kidney stones cause horrible pain and possible blockage of urine flow. In addition to conventional medications, a majority of cases can be treated with the help of natural ingredients as well. Many of them also will help prevent stones from developing in the future.

Moreover, make sure to drink plenty of water. If you drink eight to 10 glasses of water along with other kinds of fluids daily, the color of your urine will become clear, which is a good sign. Here are the top 10 home remedies for kidney stones. Also, be sure to consult your doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Home Remedies for Kidney Stones

home remedies for kidney stones

1. Pomegranate

Pomegranates are so delicious and healthy, and also one of the best ways to help treat kidney stones. Both the seeds and juice of pomegranates have astringent properties that can help in the treatment of kidney stones.

  • Try to eat one whole pomegranate or drink one glass of freshly squeezed pomegranate juice daily. You can mix pomegranate in a fruit salad also.
  • Another option is to grind one tablespoon of pomegranate seeds into a fine paste. Eat this paste along with a cup of horse gram soup once daily. This remedy will help dissolve the stones. You can find horse gram in Indian markets.

home remedies for kidney stones

2. Dandelion Root

Organic dandelion root is a great kidney tonic and cleanser. Taking up to 500 mg twice a day may be beneficial.

home remedies for kidney stones

3. Lemon Juice, Raw Apple Cider Vinegar and Olive Oil

This is one of the natural home remedies that is not only easily available in your home, but quite efficient when it comes to curing kidney stones naturally. Symptoms such as abdominal pain can be managed by blending olive oil with lemon juice extract. After drinking the mixture, ensure that you have drunk at least 12 ounces of water. Wait for at least 30 minutes before blending 0.5 ounces of lemon juice in 12 ounces of water. Add one tablespoon of raw apple cider vinegar before drinking. Repeat this cycle every one hour until the pain has subsided.

home remedies for kidney stones

4. Magnesium

Studies show that people with recurrent kidney stones who have taken magnesium supplements had a 92.3 percent improvement rate in reduction of kidney stones. 300 mg of magnesium orotate is recommended daily for prevention and reduction of stones.

home remedies for kidney stones

5. Watermelon

Who doesn’t love watermelon! It’s definitely one of my favorite fruits! Watermelon is a great and tasty way to treat kidney stones composed of calcium and magnesium phosphates and carbonates. The potassium present in watermelon is an essential ingredient for healthy kidneys. It helps regulate and maintain the acid level in urine. Along with potassium, watermelon also contains a high concentration of water, which helps in flushing out stones from the kidneys. Eating watermelon regularly can help greatly in the treatment as well as prevention of kidney stones. You can have watermelon seed tea as well.

home remedies for kidney stones

6. Change your Diet and drink plenty of Water

Unhealthy food intake is a primary cause of kidney stones. Cut down on the amount of soda and energy drinks you consume. Avoid processed foods and alcoholic beverages. Add more fruits and veggies to your diet and drink plenty of water.

home remedies for kidney stones

7. Basil

A kidney tonifier, basil tea can be taken throughout the day for overall kidney health. If you have kidney stones, try taking one teaspoon each of basil juice with raw honey daily for up to six months. Doctors and scientists have been able to prove that taking basil tea can greatly enhance the general well-being of your kidneys and it can also help induce stone expulsion from the urinary tract.

home remedies for kidney stones

8. Nettle Leaf

The nettle leaf helps maintain the flow of water through the kidneys and bladder and also promoting smooth urination. At the same time, nettle leaf helps keep crystals from forming into stones and keeps bacteria away. Nettle tea will also enhance the benefits of water by acting as a natural diuretic.

  1. Add two teaspoons of dried nettle leaf to a cup of hot water.
  2. Let it steep for 10 minutes and then strain it.
  3. Drink two to three cups of nettle tea daily for several weeks.

home remedies for kidney stones

9.  Uva Ursi

On top of enabling to combat infections that are triggered with the onset of kidney stones. Uva Ursi functions in assisting in pain reduction and cleansing of the urinary tract. Uva Ursi is also a common folk remedy for kidney stones. 500mg three times a day is recommended for kidney stones.

home remedies for kidney stones

10. Celery

A glass of raw celery juice can help relieve pain from kidney stones due to its anti-spasmodic properties. Celery juice helps clear out toxins that contribute to the formation of kidney stones. Raw celery juice is also a diuretic, which means it increases the volume of urine and helps flush out the stones.

  • Drink a glass of celery juice daily in order to prevent more stones from forming.
  • You can also use celery seed to treat kidney stones. Drinking herbal tea made with celery seeds can help treat kidney stones resulting from uric acid accumulation.

home remedies for kidney stones

11. Kidney Beans

Being high in fiber, kidney beans can be effective in the treatment of any kind of kidney or bladder problem, including kidney stones. The shape of this bean may be indicative of its healing potential. An effective urinary home remedy for kidney stones, traditionally the pods were used as a medicinal tonic. Try removing the beans from inside the pods, and then boil the pods in purified hot water for six hours. This liquid can be strained through cheese cloth, cooled and taken throughout the day for one day to ease kidney stone pain.

home remedies for kidney stones

12. Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass juice is highly effective in treating kidney stones and other kidney diseases naturally. You can also have a glass of wheatgrass juice mixed with one teaspoon each of lemon juice and juice extracted from basil leaves.

Take it two to three times a day. Wheatgrass juice is a good source of magnesium, potassium, iron, amino acids, chlorophyll, and B vitamins.

TIP: If you have a kidney stone that is stuck, sit on the floor and move as though you’re rowing a boat. This has worked for me and I always recommend it to everyone. It’s a miracle worker! Always make sure if you ever experiencing pain so bad that you feel as if your going to pass out, get to the ER as soon as possible. Especially if none of these wonderful and effective home remedies for kidney stones do not help. 

Pinched Nerve in Lower Back

 

Pinched Nerve in Lower Back

pinched nerve in lower backA pinched nerve can be extremely painful and can cause impaired function when the nerve is under so much pressure that its ability to carry signals is hindered. Pinching or compression (pressure) often affects nerve roots in the spine that control muscle movements and relay sensations of feeling throughout the body. Nerves are extensions from the brain that branch out into the arms or legs to reach the muscles or skin. A nerve cell is microscopic in size, and a nerve fiber may run several feet in length toward its destination. A nerve that lives in the brain or within the spinal cord is called a central nerve and nerves that leave the spine to go into the arms or legs are called peripheral nerves. These peripheral nerves are actually bundles of millions of nerve fibers that leave the spinal cord and branch out to their target muscles to make them move. These nerve fibers also go to the skin to provide feeling. They send important messages throughout your body. If you have a pinched nerve (nerve compression) your body may send you warning signals such as pain. Don’t ignore these warning signals. Damage from a pinched nerve may be minor or severe. It may cause temporary or long-lasting problems. The earlier you get a diagnosis and treatment for nerve compression, the more quickly you’ll find relief, but in some cases you can’t reverse the damage from a pinched nerve. Treatment will usually relieve pain and other symptoms that comes with a pinched nerve.

Symptoms of Pinched Nerves

Nerves are most vulnerable at places in your body where they travel through narrow spaces but have little soft tissue to protect them. Nerve compression often occurs when the nerve is pressed between tissues such as:

  • Ligament
  • Tendon
  • Bone

For example, inflammation or pressure on a nerve root exiting the spine may cause neck or low back pain. It may also pinched nerve in lower backcause pain to radiate from the neck into the shoulder and arm (cervical radiculopathy). Or pain may radiate into the leg and foot (sciatic nerve pain).

These symptoms may result from changes that develop in the spine’s discs and bones. For example, if a disc weakens or tears — known as a herniated disc — pressure gets put on a spinal nerve and can cause severe pain.

When a nerve gets pinched, the flow up and down the inside of the nerve is reduced or blocked, and the nutrients stop flowing. Eventually, the nerve membrane starts to lose its ability to transmit its electrical impulses and the nerve fiber may eventually die. When enough fibers stop working, the skin may feel numb, or a muscle may not contract.

With nerve compression (pressure) pain may be your only symptom or you may have other symptoms without pain. The more common symptoms of a pinched nerve may include tingling, numbness, “Pins and needles” a burning sensation or shooting pains down the buttocks and legs or in the neck, shoulders, arms and fingers. Sometimes, the pains and sensations originating from a pinched nerve are distant from the point of pressure. For instance, a pinched nerve in the lower back may show pain in the calf as its only symptom. When there is nerve damage from constant pressure, pain and muscle weakness may increase. There may be a loss of reflexes, movement skills and sensation in the affected area, as well as withering (atrophy) of the affected muscles. The weakness can occur especially during certain activities and symptoms may even worsen when you try certain movements, such as turning your head or even straining your neck. If nerve compression lasts a long time, a protective barrier around the nerve may break down. Fluid may build up, which may cause Swelling, Extra pressure and Scarring. The scarring may interfere with the nerve’s function.

Treatment for a Pinched Nerve

If you think you are showing signs of a pinched nerve or have pinched nerve in lower backalready been diagnosed with a pinched nerve in the neck or back and your tired of living with pain and discomfort. We suggest trying Doctors Pain Relief Systems. With it’s three main components, aerobic conditioning, stretching and strengthening. These exercises are the best to help relief the common causes of back pain. It’s a controlled, progressive program, with the goal of building towards a stronger, more flexible spine. It’s effective and helps relief back pain caused by the common causes of back pain, like disease or injury to the muscles, bones, and/or nerves of the spine. Our pinched nerve treatment is effective, adapts with your pain and is always backed by our 60 day money back guarantee. 

Treatment may vary depending on the severity and cause of the nerve compression.

You may find that you benefit greatly from simply resting the injured area and by avoiding any activities that tend to worsen your symptoms. In many cases, that’s all you need to do but you still want to apply the right exercises to help strengthen the muscles and spine to prevent future injury and to also help control our back pain.

If symptoms persist or pain is severe, see your doctor. You may need one or more types of treatment to shrink swollen tissue around the nerve.

In more severe cases, it may be necessary to remove material that’s pressing on a nerve, such as Scar tissue, Disc material and Pieces of bone. Be sure to speak with your doctor about your systems and work with your doctor to find the best approach for treating your symptoms.

Avoiding A Pinched Nerve 

Is it possible, maybe. Just don’t wear out your body too early and lead a life sheltered from turning, twisting and lifting. pinched nerve in lower backThere really isn’t much you can do to protect yourself from this condition. It’s simply going to happen to some people. Even though many people associate a pinched nerve with the neck or shoulder, it can happen anywhere. In the wrist, it might be a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome. In the elbow, it might be a by-product of tennis elbow, and in the lower back, it could be sciatica. But the good news is that, in the vast majority of people, the condition improves or goes away with rest and over-the-counter pain medications and even just by applying the right physical therapy. In very mild cases, the problem goes away within a few minutes. In severe cases, surgery may be the only solution. Our tip is to stay active, maintain a healthy diet and be careful and try not to lift heavy equipment or over working yourself to death. Even over doing your workouts can cause you lower back problems and one of the main causes is bad posture. We have many great articles to help give you the knowledge about common causes of back pain and what you can do to help relieve pain and prevent future injuries.

Referred Back Pain – Causes & Facts

Referred Back Pain – Causes & Facts

Sometimes back pain is not strictly related to spinal structures, back pain comes from other places, specifically internal organs. In a process called referred pain, internal organs can send pain signals to other parts of the body. For example, when someone is experiencing a heart attack, the left arm may ache. Nothing is wrong with the arm but this limb hurts because the heart is referring pain to it. The neck, mid-back and lower back are also potential targets for referred back pain. The pancreas may refer pain to the back and here are two examples when “back pain” has nothing to do with spinal problems.

The Gallbladder

The gallbladder isn’t an organ that gets a lot of attention, unless it’s causing you pain. The gallbladder is a little sac that stores bile from the liver, and it’s found just beneath your liver. The gallbladder releases bile, via the cystic duct, into the small intestine to help break down the foods you eat — particularly fatty foods. 

The gallbladder is connected to the liver via ducts that supply bile to the gallbladder for storage. These bile ducts then form the common hepatic duct that joins with the cystic duct from the gallbladder to form the common bile duct that empties into the GI tract (duodenum). In addition, the pancreatic duct usually merges with the common bile duct just before it enters the duodenum. Hormones trigger the gallbladder to release bile when fat and amino acids reach the duodenum after eating a meal which facilitates the digestion of these foods.referred back pain

Within this internal organ problems can arise like a blockage from a stone, an infection or just an inflamed gallbladder attack. Sometimes the symptoms clearly point to a problem with the gallbladder. These classic symptoms include right upper quadrant abdominal pain just underneath the right chest wall, nausea, gas and pain with a deep breath. Many times these classic symptoms occur at night or just after a meal. At first you may think that the problem is just indigestion until the symptoms progress. However, sometimes the symptoms are a little more elusive and gives a murky picture of vague discomfort and pain.

Referred gallbladder pain can be especially tricky because it is felt in the mid-back, right shoulder and between the shoulder blades. Because these symptoms are especially common in women, all women with pain in these areas should have the gallbladder evaluated and should also consider some dietary restrictions to prevent gallbladder attacks. Oftentimes, referred pain from a sick gallbladder will rear its ugly head as a serious problem requiring surgery. This scenario can be prevented if the patient and doctor have earlier suspicions of a potential gallbladder disease.
Gallbladder pain is an all-inclusive term used to describe any pain due to disease related to the gallbladder. The major gallbladder problems that produce gallbladder pain are biliary colic, cholecystitis, gallstones, pancreatitis and ascending cholangitis.

There are two major causes of pain that either originate from the gallbladder or involve the gallbladder directly. They intermittent or complete blockage of any of the ducts by gallstones or gallstone sludge and/or inflammation that may accompany irritation or infection of the surrounding tissues, when partial or complete obstruction of ducts causes pressure and ischemia (inadequate blood supply due to a blockage of blood vessels in the area) to develop in the adjacent tissues.                                                                                                                               

Gallstones usually form in the gallbladder, but may form in any of the ducts. When the gallbladder is compressed (squeezed by musculature), bile usually goes out through the ducts into the GI tract however, if gallstones or gallstone sludge is present, there can be partial or complete blockage of the ducts with pressure on the surrounding tissue, referred back painsometimes enough to cause local ischemia. Other processes such as trauma can cause gallbladder pain. Infection of the biliary ducts and the gallbladder, usually occurring after gallstone obstruction also can cause pain.

Specific symptoms may vary based on what type of gallbladder condition you have, although many symptoms are common among the different types of gallbladder problems. But most gallbladder symptoms start with pain in the upper abdominal area, either in the upper right or middle.

Below are common symptoms of gallbladder conditions:

  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Pain that may extend beneath the right shoulder blade or to the back
  • Pain that worsens after eating a meal, particularly fatty or greasy foods
  • Pain that feels dull, sharp, or crampy
  • Pain that increases when you breathe in deeply
  • Chest pain
  • Heartburn, indigestion, and excessive gas
  • A feeling of fullness in the abdomen
  • Vomiting, nausea, fever
  • Shaking with chills
  • Tenderness in the abdomen, particularly the right upper quadrant
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)
  • Stools of an unusual color (often lighter, like clay)

Some gallbladder problems, like simple gallstones that are not blocking the cystic duct, often cause no symptoms at all. They’re most often discovered during an X-ray to diagnose another condition, or even during an abdominal surgery.

The gallbladder doesn’t seem like such a big deal until it’s causing you severe pain. If you spot the symptoms of gallbladder trouble, head to your doctor for a diagnosis and prompt treatment to get your digestive tract running smoothly again.

The Bladder 

The bladder is the hollow organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. As the bladder fills, muscles in its walls relaxreferred back pain so that it can expand. As the bladder empties during urination, the muscles contract to squeeze the urine out through the urethra. Several different bladder problems can cause pain. The three most common causes of bladder pain are interstitial cystitis, urinary tract infection and bladder cancer.

The bladder is the all important organ in the pelvis that collects and hopefully empties urine at the right time. Many problems can arise here like infections, cancer, interstitial cystitis and arguably the worst problem, a “fallen bladder” (a.k.a. Prolapsed Bladder, Cystocele). That’s right the bladder can literally fall out. Varying degrees of a prolapsed bladder exist starting with Grade 1, where just a little portion of the bladder pokes into the vagina, all the way to Grade 4, where the entire bladder is fallen out into and through the vagina. Now that condition can be as painful as it sounds and looks. Pain from the prolapsed bladder can be felt in the lower back, sacrum and pelvic region.

Interstitial Cystitis

Often misdiagnosed as a urinary tract infection, interstitial cystitis can take up to four years to be properly diagnosed. Once it is diagnosed, your doctor can offer you treatment for it and its symptoms, including bladder burn. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, interstitial cystitis, a medical condition that causes inflammation of the bladder wall, affects 1.3 million Americans, 1 million of whom are women. Symptoms include mild or burning pain in the bladder and pelvic area, frequent urges to urinate and pain during sexual referred back painintercourse. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic condition in which the bladder becomes inflamed and irritated. The inflammation stiffens the bladder wall, and makes it difficult for the bladder to fully expand when filling with urine. IC may be caused by a defect in the bladder lining. Women are much more likely than men to have the condition.

A main symptom is pain, which is strongest when the bladder fills and eases when the bladder empties. Pain may also be felt more generally in the lower back, abdomen or groin. People with this condition may also urinate more frequently or feel an urgent need to urinate, yet they may only pass a little bit of urine each time. Sexual problems may also be related to interstitial cystitis.

Urinary Tract

Your urinary tract is the system that makes urine and carries it out of your body. It includes your bladder and kidneys and the tubes that connect them. When germs get into this system they can cause an infection.

Most urinary tract infections are bladder infections. A bladder infection usually is not serious if it’s treated right away. If you don’t take care of a bladder infection, it can spread to your kidneys. A kidney infection is serious and can causereferred back pain permanent damage.

Usually, germs get into your system through your urethra, the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body. The germs that usually cause these infections live in your large intestine and are found in your stool. If these germs get inside your urethra, they can travel up into your bladder and kidneys and cause an infection.

For reasons that are not well understood, some women get bladder infections again and again.

You may have an infection if you have any of these symptoms:

  • You feel pain or burning when you urinate.
  • You feel like you have to urinate often, but not much urine comes out when you do.
  • You have pain in your lower belly and back.
  • Your urine is cloudy, looks pink or red, or smells bad.
  • You have pain on one side of your back under your ribs. This is where your kidneys are.
  • You have fever and chills.
  • You have nausea and vomiting.

Call your doctor right away if you think you have an infection and:

  • You have a fever, nausea and vomiting, or pain in one side of your back under your ribs.
  • You have diabetes, kidney problems, or a weak immune system.
  • You are older than 65.
  • You are pregnant.

Your doctor will ask for a sample of your urine. It is tested to see if it has germs that cause bladder infections.

If you have infections often, you may need extra testing to find out why.

If a woman has lower back pain with the “usual” urinary incontinence, a mild prolapsed bladder can be mistaken as just “lower back pain.” As the bladder falls further and the pain gets worse, the prolapsed bladder becomes more obvious. After a little “nip, tuck and sling,” the bladder can be put back into place and the back pain magically disappears. Other female organs can prolapse and cause back pain besides just the bladder. So, women with back pain might want to consider having a full pelvic exam especially if urinary incontinence is present. Back pain may not be all that it seems. 

Back pain is an easy diagnosis to throw around and sweep under the rug because it is so common. But other common problems can be mistaken as just typical back pain, particularly gallbladder and bladder problems. These internal organs are especially problematic for women. Women with back pain should be aware of these cases of mistaken identity and mistaken diagnosis. Unfortunately for some women, it can take years to find the real reason for so called “back pain.” A bit more thoroughness can uncover an unhappy internal organ and possibly a better solution.  If you think that you may have another reason to have back pain, talk with your doctor and ask for some more investigation. Because your health and life matters!