Home Remedies For A Sore Throat

Home Remedies For A Sore Throat

Home Remedies For A Sore Throat A sore throat can be the first sign of a cold, a side effect of strained vocal cords, or an indication of something more serious (like strep throat). Regardless of the cause, your immediate concern when soreness strikes is how to get relief, fast. You may be tempted to run to your doctor, but some of the best treatments are home remedies. Sore throats are often caused by viral, not bacterial infections. That means antibiotics won’t help.

Allergies, dry air, and outdoor pollution, as well as illnesses like the common cold, flu, measles, chickenpox, mononucleosis (mono), and the croup, can all cause sore throats. These illnesses are all viral infections that will not respond to antibiotics. Bacterial infections are responsible for only a small percentage of sore throats, including those linked with strep throat, whooping cough and diphtheria. Most doctors recommend calling a doctor only in cases of severe sore throat accompanied by a fever, or when swollen tonsils block the throat.

 A sore throat can be a royal pain. Like blinking, we never notice how much we swallow until we start paying attention to it and when it hurts like nobody’s business, it’s kind of difficult not to pay attention. But before you go getting down about how long you’re going to have to suffer with it, consider taking some action-relief that may be closer than you think. Gargling is a simple and remarkably effective way to kill germs and soothe a sore throat. Below are 22 simple at home sore throat remedies that will help you get started on naturally soothing the ache.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Anti-inflammatories

One of the most effective treatments for sore throat is probably already in your medicine cabinet: an over-the-counter, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as Advil or Motrin.

These medicines are combination pain relievers and anti-inflammatories, so they’ll make you feel better and they’ll also reduce some of the swelling associated with a sore throat. If you have a fever that’s also contributing to your symptoms, they can help reduce that as well.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Honey

Honey mixed in tea or simply taken straight up has long been a home remedy for sore throat. Scientific studies have confirmed this natural wonder works. A study of 139 children with upper respiratory infections, for example, found that honey was even more effective at taming nighttime coughs than common cough suppressants.

Studies have also shown that honey is an effective wound healer, which means it may also help speed healing for sore throats.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Saltwater gargle

Several studies have found that gargling several times a day with warm salt water can reduce swelling in the throat and loosen mucus, helping to flush out irritants or bacteria. Doctors generally recommend dissolving half a teaspoon of salt in one cup of water. If the salty taste is too unpleasant for you, try adding a small amount of honey to sweeten the mixture slightly. (Just remember to spit the water out after gargling, rather than swallowing!)

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Kick It With Cayenne

Drinking warm water with cayenne can actually make you feel better. This is another one of those really funky sounding home remedies, but again, a lot of people swear by it. Dumping something involving hot peppers in any way, shape, or form down your already searing throat seems counterintuitive to helping it, but there’s a method to the madness. Cayenne (and other hot peppers) have a chemical compound called capsaicin that temporarily relieves pain, much like Advil or Aspirin does. It accomplishes this by hindering something called substance P, which is what transmits pain signals to your brain. Thus, the discomfort from your sore throat is diluted when coming in contact with the Cayenne-and quickly to boot.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Ginger, honey, and lemon in water

This home remedy mixes 1 teaspoon each of powdered ginger and honey, 1⁄2 cup of hot water, and the juice of 1⁄2 squeezed lemon. Pour the water over the ginger, then add the lemon juice and honey, and gargle. Honey coats the throat and also has mild antibacterial properties.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Turmeric and water

This yellow spice is a powerful antioxidant, and scientists think it has the strength to fight many serious diseases. For a sore throat remedy, mix 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric and 1/2 teaspoon of salt into 1 cup of hot water and gargle.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Green tea

Green tea is known to naturally fight infections. Next time you brew a cup, make a little extra and gargle with some of this remedy to kill any bacteria your sore throat may be harboring. 

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Apple cider vinegar, salt and honey

If your throat is left raw by a bad cough, grab a bottle of apple cider vinegar because germs can’t survive in the acidic coating it’ll form on your throat. Gargle with 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar and 1 teaspoon salt dissolved in a glass of warm water; use several times a day if needed. For a gentler treatment, combine 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar and 1/4 cup honey and take 1 tablespoon every four hours as needed.

 

home remedies for a sore throat

Echinacea and water

Echinacea is an herbal virus-killer. Add 2 teaspoons tincture of echinacea to 1 cup water and gargle this home remedy three times daily. In addition to easing sore throat pain, an echinacea gargle will give your immune system the boost it needs to fight the infection.

home remedies for a sore throat

Chicken noodle soup

A Japanese study found that chicken contains an amino acid which helps thin out mucus in the lungs, allowing you to cough up the bad stuff faster and remedy a huge cause of sore throats–postnasal drip. Plus a landmark study from the University of Nebraska Medical Center proved that the famous chicken noodle soup really can help fight off a virus by acting as an anti-inflammatory. Stick to a vegetable-packed version, it’s the combination of vegetables, chicken and the broth that makes mom’s soup so powerful. Also something I do is add about a half teaspoon of garlic, pepper, Cajun seasoning, sprinkle of salt. The pepper and garlic and even Cajun seasoning works wonders. After eating my noodle soup and drinking all the broth, I’ll take a hot shower and sleep it off, waking up to feeling a lot better and even to no sore throat!

Remember if your sore throat seems to get worse, be sure to consult your doctor. I sure hope these remedies help you recover faster so you can get back to feeling better and living your life. If you have any suggestions or even a home remedy that always helps you, share with us and help others get fast relief! Hope you feel better soon!!

Bad Posture Back Pain

bad posture back pain

Bad Posture Back Pain

Having good posture is a simple but very important way to keep the many intricate structures in the back and spine healthy. It’s much more than cosmetic – good posture and back support are critical to reducing the incidence and levels of back pain and neck pain. Back support is especially important for patients who spend many hours sitting in an officebad posture back pain chair or standing throughout the day. Posture is the way you hold your body while standing, sitting or performing tasks like lifting, bending, pulling or reaching. If your posture is good, the bones of the spine — the vertebrae — are correctly aligned. The back has three natural curves: a slight forward curve in the neck (cervical curve), a slight backward curve in the upper back (thoracic curve) and a slight forward curve in the low back (lumbar curve). When these curves are in proper alignment, the spine, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles are in balance, and body weight is evenly distributed. The payoff is less stress and strain on muscles, joints, and ligaments, and a reduced risk for back, neck, and shoulder pain.

Over time, the stress of poor posture can change the anatomical characteristics of the spine, leading to the possibility of constricted blood vessels and nerves, as well as problems with muscles, discs, and joints. All of these can be major contributors to back and neck pain, as well as headaches, fatigue, and possibly even concerns with major organs and breathing. Poor posture—while sitting, standing, lying down or moving around—is a major cause of back pain. Sitting and standing put considerable pressure on the lower back—in fact, standing exerts up to five times more pressure than lying down, and sitting is even more strenuous. Basically, having correct posture means keeping each part of the body in alignment with the neighboring parts. Proper posture keeps all parts balanced and supported. With appropriate posture (when standing) it should be possible to draw a straight line from the earlobe, through the shoulder, hip, knee, and into the middle of the ankle.

People may find themselves in several positions throughout the day (sitting, standing, bending, stooping and lying down) it’s important to learn how to attain and keep correct posture in each position for good back support, which will result in less back pain. When moving from one position to another, the ideal situation is that one’s posture is adjusted smoothly and fluidly. After initial correction of bad posture habits, these movements tend to become automatic and require very little effort to maintain. Maintaining good posture involves training your body to move and function where the least strain is placed on bones, joints and soft tissues.

Recognize The Symptoms of Bad Posture.bad posture back pain

To help evaluate your posture, look at yourself in a full-length mirror. The classic signs of poor posture are a potbelly, rounded shoulders, and a jutted-out neck and chin (known as a forward head position). Other signs of poor posture include slumped or protruding abdomen, excessive curve in the lower back (swayback) and a caved-in appearance to the chest, as well as back and neck pain and headaches.

4 Steps To Good Posture

You can improve your posture by practicing some imagery and a few easy and quick exercises.

  • Imagery. Think of a straight line passing through your body from ceiling to floor (your ears, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles should be even and line up vertically). Now imagine that a strong cord attached to your breastbone is pulling your chest and rib cage upward, making you taller.
  • Chin tuck. Sit comfortably in a chair with your feet flat on the floor. Keep your shoulders relaxed and down. Hold your head upright. Pull your chin in toward your neck.
  • Abdominal pull-in. Stand or sit. Inhale; then exhale slowly to a count of five, pulling your lower abdominal muscles up and in, as if moving your belly button toward your backbone.
  • Shoulder blade squeeze. Sit up straight in a chair with your hands resting on your thighs. Keep your shoulders down and your chin level. Slowly draw your shoulders back and squeeze your shoulder blades together.
  • Upper-body stretch. Stand facing a corner with your arms raised, hands flat against the walls, elbows at shoulder height. Place one foot ahead of the other. Bending your forward knee, exhale as you lean your body toward the corner. Keep your back straight and your chest and head up.

What Good Posture Can Do For You

  • Optimize breathing and circulation
  • Maintain the bones and joints in the correct alignment so that muscles are being used properly and efficiently
  • Helps reduce or prevent the abnormal wearing of joint surfaces that could result in degenerative diseases, such as arthritis
  • Decrease the stress on the soft tissues, such as ligaments, muscles, tendons and discs
  • Prevent fatigue because muscles are being used more efficiently, allowing the body to use less energybad posture back pain
  • Prevent the spine from becoming fixed in abnormal positions
  • Prevent postural strain or overuse problems
  • Prevent muscle fatigue
  • Contributes to a healthy image or appearance
  • Improves organ function
  • Reduces tension and pain in neck, shoulders and back
  • Increases concentration and mental performance
  • Prevents humped shoulders
  • Increases height
  • Prevents “pot belly”
  • Increased confidence

More Tips For Maintaining Good Posture

Many simple lifestyle changes can help improve your posture and reduce back pain.

  • Be mindful of your posture throughout the day, and realign yourself regularly.
  • To prevent muscle fatigue, avoid staying in one position for a long time.bad posture back pain
  • When standing for long periods try resting one foot on a low ledge, stool, or box.
  • If you prefer slow, gentle, physical activity, try t’ai chi or aquatic exercises to improve your posture, strength, and balance.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that offer good support.
  • Hold reading material at eye level.
  • Sleep on a firm, comfortable mattress.
  • Exercise regularly to promote strong abdominal and back muscles.
  • If you have any concerns about your posture, consider a session with a physical therapist trained to evaluate posture.

By continuing to have bad posture, you open yourself up to a whirlwind of problems. Our spines were meant to be in a certain order with certain curves in certain directions. Our joints are constructed in a certain manner to allow us to function as best as we can. Most of what we do makes us crouch forward into this fetal position (ie. driving, texting, playing video games, typing on the computer, etc.) which over stretches most of our back muscles and tightens and shortens most of our front muscles. This makes that posture best designed for optimum function to lack, which causes degeneration within our bodies.  Remind yourself to fix your posture, and you will begin to reteach your body how to hold itself. If you’re sitting, sit up straight. If it hurts after 5 minutes, keep doing it. Remind yourself to do it as much as you can. The main reason it hurts is because you’re not used to it. By continuing to sit and stand in better posture, you will strengthen the muscles that have been weakened by years of malpractice.

Back Muscles

Back Muscles

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Muscles are cordlike structures, they can stretch and have the ability to contract, or shorten. This is, in fact, what happens when you lift a cup of coffee, throw a ball, or do anything that requires movement of the body. The muscles shorten and lengthen, pulling the bones in different directions to coordinate our movements. When you lift, lower, push, pull, carry, or perform any activity, the muscles are doing the work. Muscles also work to keep the body from moving when movement is not desired. For example, if you are sitting in a canoe and the canoe starts to tip to the left, your muscles quickly respond by coordinating your body’s movement to the right to maintain your balance.

Muscles are true workhorses and can be your back’s best friend. When conditioned, your muscles maintain their strength, endurance, and flexibility, which allows the body to move and work with less risk of injury and pain. When working properly, the muscles can greatly reduce the load on the bones, facet joints, disks, and ligaments. In contrast, when the muscles become deconditioned from lack of use or from injury, they tend to lose their size, strength, endurance, and flexibility and can also be painful! Back muscles, like any other muscle in the body, require adequate exercise to maintain strength and tone.

While muscles like the gluteals (in the thighs) are used any time we walk or climb a step, deep back muscles and abdominal muscles are usually left inactive and unconditioned. Unless muscles are specifically exercised, back muscles and abdominal muscles tend to weaken with age.

The three types of back muscles that help the spine function are extensors, flexors and obliques.

To treat back pain in the lower spine and lower back, always focus on strengthening the flexor, extensor and oblique muscles to help reinforce support of the spine and in turn, reducing low back pain and sometimes even eliminating the pain.

Extensor, Flexor and Oblique Muscles

  • The extensor muscles are attached to the posterior (back) of the spine and enable standing and lifting objects. These muscles include the large paired muscles in the lower back (erector spinae), which help hold up the spine, and gluteal muscles.back muscles
  • The flexor muscles are attached to the anterior (front) of the spine (which includes the abdominal muscles) and enable flexing, bending forward, lifting, and arching the lower back.
  • The oblique muscles are attached to the sides of the spine and help rotate the spine and maintain proper posture.

There is a large and complex group of muscles that work together to support the spine, help hold the body upright and allow the trunk of the body to move, twist and bend in many directions. Back muscles are divided into two specific groups: the extrinsic muscles that are associated with upper extremity and shoulder movement, and the intrinsic muscles that deal with movements of the vertebral column. Several small muscles in the cervical area of the vertebral column are also important.

The Extrinsic Muscles

Superficial extrinsic muscles connect your upper extremities to the trunk, and they form the V-shaped musculature associated with the middle and upper back. They include the trapezius, latissimus dorsi, levator scapulae, and the rhomboids. Intermediate extrinsic muscles include the serratus posterior superior and inferior. Most of their function is involved with respiration.

The Intrinsic Muscles

Intrinsic muscles, which stretch all the way from the pelvis to the cranium, help to maintain your posture and move the vertebral column. They’re divided into three groups: the superficial layer, the intermediate layer, and the deep layer. The muscles in all of the layers are innervated by the posterior rami of spinal nerves. Injuries of the intrinsic back muscles often occur while using improper lifting technique. You can protect the back muscles by bending from the hip and knee when you lift objects from the ground.

The Superficial Layer

(Splenius muscles)

Muscles originating from the vertebral column and having their fleshy bellies located in the back, but inserting onto the appendicular skeleton of the upper limb or the ribs. They are not innervated by dorsal primary rami of spinal nerves, as are the deep or true muscles of the back. The superficial extrinsic back muscle group is comprised of 4 muscles: The trapezius, latissiumus dorsi, levator scapula and the rhomboids.

Trapezius Muscle

One of the most notable features of the trapezius muscle is its shape. The trapezius (called “traps” for short) is a large triangular shaped muscle located at the mid and upper back, and at the neck and shoulders. This muscle has a number of functions, not the least of which involves moving the shoulder blades (these are the flat – also triangularly shaped – bones that sit on the back of the ribcage.) Other functions of the trapezius includes contributing to head and neck motions, and assisting with breathing.

Latissiumus Dorsi

Another triangularly shaped muscle, the latissimus dorsi, is a key player when you use your arms to pull your body weight. For this reason, it is often referred to as the “swimmer’s muscle.” (The latissiumus dorsi is also called the “lats” for short.) The lats assist with breathing, too. The lats are take up a goodly amount of space in the low and mid back. They start at the bottom of the thoracic spine and ribs, the thoracolumbar fascia and part of your hip bone. They then taper into a fine point that inserts on the inside of the upper arm bone.

Levator Sacpulaback muscles

The levator scapula muscle starts at the neck and travels down to attach on the media corner of the top of the shoulder blade. Its job is to lift the shoulder blade up toward the ears. This action is unfortunately constantly “on” for most of us, which can result in lots of neck and shoulder tension.

Rhomboids

The rhomboid muscles are two paralleogram shaped muscles (right and left) that extend from the midline of the spine to the inner border of the scapula (shoulder blade bone.) Each rhomboid consists of a major and minor part, called, respectively the rhomboid major and the rhomboid minor. Though two separate structures, the major and minor make one overall shape and act as a unit to squeeze the shoulder blades together. Because of its action (of squeezing the shoulder blades together), targeting the rhomboids for posture improvement exercise may be a good idea. The action of squeezing the shoulder blades together (towards the spine) may help reverse the effects of sitting at the computer and/or other forms of postural kyphosis.

Teres Major

The teres major is a small, yet important muscle within the back. It is located underneath the lats, and has adopted the nickname, “The Little Lat.” As you might imagine, the teres major works in conjuction with the lats. But it also works with the rotator cuff muscles. Its functions include pulling the arms downwards and rotating them inwards.

The Intermediate Layer

(Erector spinae)

This massive muscle forms a prominent bulge on each side of the vertebral column. It lies within a fascial compartment between the posterior and anterior layers of the thoracolumbar fascia. The common origin of the three columns is though a broad tendon that is attached inferiorly to the posterior part of the iliac crest, the posterior aspect of the sacrum, the sacroiliac ligaments, and the sacral and inferior lumbar spinous processes. This large muscle originates near the sacrum and extends vertically up the length of the back. It lies on each side of the vertebral column and extends alongside the lumbar, thoracic and cervical sections of the spine. The erector spinae functions to straighten the back and provides for side-to-side rotation. An injury or strain to this muscle may cause back spasms and pain. The erector spinae is arranged in three vertical columns: iliocostalis (lateral column); longissimus (intermediate column); and spinalis (medial column).

Iliocostalis

The iliocostalis is the muscle immediately lateral to the longissimus that is the nearest to the furrow that separates the epaxial muscles from the hypaxial. It lies very deep to the fleshy portion of the serratus ventralis (serratus anterior). The iliocostalis originates from the sacrum, erector spinae aponeurosis and iliac crest. The iliocostalis has three different insertions according to the parts.

The iliocostalis cervicis (cervicalis ascendens) arises from the angles of the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth ribs, and is inserted into the posterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the fourth, fifth, and sixth cervical vertebrae.

The iliocostalis dorsi (musculus accessorius; iliocostalis thoracis) arises by flattened tendons from the upper borders of the angles of the lower six ribs medial to the tendons of insertion of the iliocostalis lumborum; these become muscular, and are inserted into the upper borders of the angles of the upper six ribs and into the back of the transverse process of the seventh cervical vertebra.

The iliocostalis lumborum (iliocostalis muscle; sacrolumbalis muscle) is inserted, by six or seven flattened tendons, into the inferior borders of the angles of the lower six or seven ribs.

Longissimus

The longissimus is the muscle lateral to the semispinalis. It is the longest subdivision of the sacrospinalis that extends forward into the transverse processes of the posterior cervical vertebrae. The longissimus muscle has three parts with different origin and insertion.

The longissimus thoracis is the intermediate and largest of the continuations of the sacrospinalis.

In the lumbar region, where it is as yet blended with the iliocostalis lumborum, some of its fibers are attached to the whole length of the posterior surfaces of the transverse processes and the accessory processes of the lumbar vertebræ, and to the anterior layer of the lumbodorsal fascia.

In the thoracic region, it is inserted, by rounded tendons, into the tips of the transverse processes of all the thoracic vertebræ, and by fleshy processes into the lower nine or ten ribs between their tubercles and angles.back muscles

The longissimus cervicis (transversalis cervicis), situated medial to the longissimus dorsi, arises by long, thin tendons from the summits of the transverse processes of the upper four or five thoracic vertebræ, and is inserted by similar tendons into the posterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the cervical vertebrae from the second to the sixth inclusive.

The longissimus capitis (trachelomastoid muscle) lies medial to the longissimus cervicis, between it and the semispinalis capitis.

It arises by tendons from the transverse processes of the upper four or five thoracic vertebræ, and the articular processes of the lower three or four cervical vertebrae, and is inserted into the posterior margin of the mastoid process, beneath the splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus.

It is almost always crossed by a tendinous intersection near its insertion.

Spinalis

The spinalis is a portion of the erector spinae, a bundle of muscles and tendons, located nearest to the spine. It is divided into three parts: Spinalis dorsi, spinalis cervicis, and spinalis capitis. The spinalis muscle has three parts.

Spinalis dorsi, the medial continuation of the sacrospinalis, is scarcely separable as a distinct muscle. It is situated at the medial side of the longissimus dorsi, and is intimately blended with it; it arises by three or four tendons from the spinous processes of the first two lumbar and the last two thoracic vertebrae: these, uniting, form a small muscle which is inserted by separate tendons into the spinous processes of the upper thoracic vertebrae, the number varying from four to eight. It’s intimately united with the semispinalis dorsi, situated beneath it.

Spinalis cervicis, or spinalis colli, is an inconstant muscle, which arises from the lower part of the ligamentum nuchæ, the spinous process of the seventh cervical, and sometimes from the spinous processes of the first and second thoracic vertebrae, and is inserted into the spinosus process of the axis, and occasionally into the spinous processes of the two cervical vertebrae below it.

Spinalis capitis (biventer cervicis) is usually inseparably connected with the semispinalis capitis.

Iliocostalis muscle A muscle part of the erector spinae muscle group which helps to extend the spine (bend backwards).

The Deep Layer

(Transversosinal muscles)

Underneath the intermediate intrinsic back muscles is another layer of muscles that help to support posture and assist the intermediate muscles in moving the spine. The deep intrinsic muscles are smaller than the erector spinae muscles, and none of them traverse more than six vertebral segments.

Semispinalis Muscles

This group is the most superficial of the deep intrinsic muscles. These muscles run from the midthoracic spine superiorly through the cervical spine. They have three divisions (thoracis, cervicis, and capitis) that originate from the transverse processes of the 4th cervical vertebra through the 10th, 11th, or 12th thoracic vertebra. The fibers travel superiorly for about four to six segments each and attach on spinous processes and the occipital bone.

Semispinalis Dorsi

The semispinalis dorsi (or semispinalis thoracis) consists of thin, narrow, fleshy fasciculi, interposed between tendons of considerable length. It arises by a series of small tendons from the transverse processes of the sixth to the tenth thoracic vertebrae, and is inserted, by tendons, into the spinous processes of the upper four thoracic and lower two cervical vertebrae.

Semispinalis Cervicis

The semispinalis cervicis (semispinalis colli), arises by a series of tendinous and fleshy fibers from the transverse processes of the upper five or six thoracic vertebrae, and is inserted into the cervical spinous processes, from the axis to the fifth inclusive. The fasciculus connected with the axis is the largest, and is chiefly muscular in structure. The semispinalis cervicis is thicker than the semispinalis dorsi.

Semispinalis Capitis5OyMSkp5XBeyBeaPydd16A

The semispinalis capitis (complexus) is situated at the upper and back part of the neck, deep to the splenius, and medial to the longissimus cervicis and capitis. It is part of the transversospinales muscle group. It arises by a series of tendons from the tips of the transverse processes of the upper six or seven thoracic and the seventh cervical vertebrae, and from the articular processes of the three cervical vertebrae above this (C4-C6). The tendons, uniting, form a broad muscle, which passes upward, and is inserted between the superior and inferior nuchal lines of the occipital bone. It lies deep to the trapezius muscle and can be palpated as firm round muscle mass just lateral to the cervical spinous processes. The semispinalis muscles are innervated by the dorsal rami of the cervical spinal nerves.

Multifidus muscles

Multifidus is a series of small muscles which travel up the length of the spine. These short, triangular muscles originate in various places but always travel superiorly and medially for two to four segments and attach on the spinous processes. The multifidus consists of a number of fleshy and tendinous fasciculi, which fill up the groove on either side of the spinous processes of the vertebrae, from the sacrum to the axis. Each fasciculus, passes obliquely upward and medialward to insert into the whole length of the spinous process of one of the vertebrae above. The fasciculi vary in length: the most superficial, the longest, pass from one vertebra to the third or fourth above; those next in order run from one vertebra to the second or third above; while the deepest connect two contiguous vertebrae.

Rotatores muscles

The rotatores lie underneath the multifidus muscles. They originate from the transverse processes of a single vertebra and travel superiorly to insert into the spinous process of the vertebra one or two segments superior to it. The rotatores help with rotation and proprioception.

External oblique abdominal muscles One of the powerful rotator muscles of the spine whose fibers run obliquely to the long axis of the body. Contribute to spinal movement by compressing the stomach organs and flexing the spine.

Internal oblique abdominal muscles One of the rotator muscles of the spine whose fibers run obliquely to the long axis of the body. Contribute to spinal movement by compressing the stomach organs and flexing the spine.

Rectus abdominis muscle A muscle that contributes to spinal movement by compressing the stomach organs and flexing the spine.

The Suboccipital Muscles

The suboccipital region includes the posterior part of the 2nd cervical vertebra to the area inferior to the occipital region of the head. Four small muscles located on each side of the suboccipital region help with posture and assist with extension and rotation of the head.back muscles

Rectus capitis posterior muscles: These two muscles insert onto the occipital bone; the rectus capitis posterior major originates at the spinous process of the 2nd cervical vertebra (the axis) and the rectus capitis posterior minor originates from the posterior arch of the 1st cervical vertebra (the atlas).

Obliquus muscles: These two muscles complete the suboccipital quartet. The obliquus capitis inferior travels from the spinous process of the 2nd cervical vertebra to the transverse process of the 1st cervical vertebra, and the obliquus capitis superior has its origin at the transverse process of the 1st cervical vertebra and inserts onto the occipital bone. 

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