Alzheimer’s – What To Know and Expect

Alzheimer's - What To Know and Expect

Alzheimer’s – What To Know and Expect

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, a serious brain disorder that impacts daily living through memory loss and cognitive changes. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s is memory loss, especially forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own. Things you once did easily will become increasingly difficult, such as maintaining a schedule or managing money. Some people may try to cover up their difficulties to protect themselves and their family from embarrassment. Or, they may be reluctant to ask for help. Trying to do what others in the early stage have called “faking it” and covering up errors can be a great source of stress. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases. Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops the disease. Alzheimer’s is a serious disease that can cause a great deal of stress, hurt and even worry not only on the patient but their loved ones. The best thing you can do is learn about this horrible disease and be there for your loved one.

Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging, although the greatest known risk factor is increasing age and the majority of people with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older. But Alzheimer’s is not just a disease of old age. Up to 5 percent of people with the disease have early onset Alzheimer’s (also known as younger-onset), which often appears when someone is in their 40s or 50s. Alzheimer’s worsens over time. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In the early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage Alzheimer’s, individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Those with Alzheimer’s live an average of eight years after their symptoms become noticeable to others, but survival can range from four to 20 years, depending on age and other health conditions. Alzheimer’s has no current cure, but treatments for symptoms are available and research continues. Although current Alzheimer’s treatments cannot stop Alzheimer’s from progressing, they can temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and improve quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. Today, there is a worldwide effort under way to find better ways to treat this horrible disease, delay its onset and prevent it from developing. 

Alzheimer’s Facts

  • More than 5 million Americans are living with the disease.
  • Every 67 seconds someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s.
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States.
  • There are approximately 500,000 people dying each year because they have Alzheimer’s
  • 1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.
  • In 2013, 15.5 million caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care valued at more than $220 billion.
  • In her 60s, a woman’s estimated lifetime risk for developing Alzheimer’s is 1 in 6. For breast cancer it is 1 in 11.
  • There are 2.5 times more women than men providing intensive “on-duty” care 24 hours a day for someone with Alzheimer’s.
  • Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women
  • More than 60 percent of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers are women.
  • Alzheimer’s disease is the most expensive condition in the nation. In 2014, the direct costs to American society of caring for those with Alzheimer’s will total an estimated $214 billion, including $150 billion in costs to Medicare and Medicaid. Despite these staggering figures, Alzheimer’s will cost an estimated $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) in 2050.

Top 10 signs/symptoms of Alzheimer’s

If you or someone you know is experiencing any of the signs, please see a doctor. Early diagnosis gives you a chance to seek treatment and plan for the Alzheimer's - What To Know and Expectfuture.

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure
  4. Confusion with time or place
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  6. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  7. Decreased or poor judgment
  8. Changes in mood and personality
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities
  10. New problems with words in speaking or writing

Stages of Alzheimer’s

  • Stage 1 – Mild/Early (lasts 2-4 yrs) – Frequent recent memory loss, particularly of recent conversations and events. Repeated questions, some problems expressing and understanding language. Mild coordination problems: writing and using objects becomes difficult. Depression and apathy can occur, accompanied by mood swings. Need reminders for daily activities, and may have difficulty driving.
  • Stage 2 – Moderate/Middle (lasts 2-10 yrs) – Can no longer cover up problems. Pervasive and persistent memory loss, including forgetfulness about personal history and inability to recognize friends and family. Rambling speech, unusual reasoning, and confusion about current events, time, and place. More likely to become lost in familiar settings, experience sleep disturbances, and changes in mood and behavior, which can be aggravated by stress and change. May experience delusions, aggression, and uninhibited behavior. Mobility and coordination is affected by slowness, rigidity, and tremors. Need structure, reminders, and assistance with the activities of daily living.
  • Stage 3 – Severe/Late (lasts 1-3+ yrs) – Confused about past and present. Loss of ability to remember, communicate, or process information. Generally incapacitated with severe to total loss of verbal skills. Unable to care for self. Falls possible and immobility likely. Problems with swallowing, incontinence, and illness. Extreme problems with mood, behavior, hallucinations, and delirium. In this stage, the person will need round the clock intensive support and care.

Significant cognitive and memory loss are not symptoms of normal aging. However, these symptoms do not always indicate Alzheimer’s disease. Other conditions can also cause mental decline.

Symptoms that mimic early Alzheimer’s disease may result from:

  • Central nervous system and other degenerative disorders, including head injuries, brain tumors, stroke, epilepsy, Pick’s Disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease.
  • Metabolic ailments, such as hypothyroidism, hypoglycemia, malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, dehydration, kidney or liver failure.
  • Substance-induced conditions, such as drug interactions, medication side-effects, alcohol and drug abuse.
  • Psychological factors, such as dementia syndrome, depression, emotional trauma, chronic stress, psychosis, chronic sleep deprivation, delirium.
  • Infections, such as meningitis, encephalitis, and syphilis.

Are you at risk for Alzheimer’s?

  • The primary risk factors of Alzheimer’s are age, family history, and genetics. However, there are other risk factors that you can influence. Alzheimer's - What To Know and ExpectMaintaining a healthy heart and avoiding high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and high cholesterol can decrease the risk of Alzheimer’s. Watch your weight, avoid tobacco and excess alcohol, stay socially connected, and exercise both your body and mind.
  • Early-onset Alzheimer’s affects patients under the age of 65. This relatively rare condition is seen more often in patients whose parents or grandparents developed Alzheimer’s disease at a young age, and is generally associated with three specific gene mutations (the APP gene found on chromosome 21, the PSI gene on chromosome 12, and the PS2 gene on chromosome 1).

Living with Alzheimer’s disease is a challenge for anyone. It’s difficult to remember things, make decisions, and find your way around the way you used to. It can be frustrating a good deal of the time, but there are good days and bad days. Here are some helpful tips and things you can do to make things easier for yourself — to make things feel a bit more normal again. To help cope with memory loss, planning your day, avoid getting lost and communicating with others.

  • Place sticky notes around the house when you need to remember things.
  • Label cupboards and drawers with words or pictures that describe their contents.
  • Place important phone numbers in large print next to the phone.
  • Ask a friend or family member to call and remind you of important things that you need to do in the day, like meal times, medication times, and appointments.
  • Always keep a book with you to record important information, phone numbers, names, ideas you have, appointments, your address, and directions to your home.
  • Use a calendar to keep track of time and to remember important dates.
  • Use photos of people you see often labeled with their names.
  • Keep track of phone messages by using an answering machine.
  • It will be easier to accomplish tasks during the times of the day when you feel best.
  • Allow yourself the time to do the things you need to do, and don’t feel rushed or let other people rush you.
  • If something gets too difficult, take a break.
  • Ask for help if you need it.
  • Find things to do that you enjoy and are able to do safely on your own.
  • Ask someone to go with you when you go out.
  • Ask for help if you need it and explain that you have a memory problem.
  • Always take directions for where you’re going with you.
  • Always take your time, and don’t feel rushed
  • Avoid distracting noises, and find a quiet place to talk.
  • If you need to, ask the person you’re speaking with to repeat what he/she is saying or to speak slowly if you do not understand.

It is important to realize that at some point, it will become too difficult or dangerous for you to live by yourself. But, in the earliest stages of the disease, many people do manage on their own — with support and help from friends, family, and community programs and with simple adjustments and safety practices in place. Just because you forget things, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have Alzheimer’s. Even when you fear the worst, the earlier you seek help, the better your chances of getting the care you need and maximizing your quality of life.

Scoliosis – Get A Better Understanding

Scoliosis – Get A Better Understanding

Scoliosis is an abnormal curve in the spine. There are several types of scoliosis based on the cause and age when the curve scoliosisdevelops. Depending on the severity of the curve and the risk for it getting worse, scoliosis can be treated with observation, bracing, or surgery. Scoliosis is not a disease, but rather it’s a term used to describe any abnormal, sideways curvature of the spine. Viewed from the back, a typical spine is straight. When scoliosis occurs, the spine can curve in one of three ways:

  • The spine curves to the side as a single curve to the left (shaped like the letter C), called levoscoliosis
  • The spine curves to the side as a single curve to the right (shaped like a backwards letter C), called dextroscoliosis
  • The spine has two curves (shaped like the letter S).

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. While scoliosis can be caused by conditions such as cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy, the cause of most scoliosis is unknown. Because the skeletons of children and young adults grow quickly, there is a reasonable chance that if a curve is detected, the degree of the spinal curve may worsen as the spine continues to grow. In those cases, scoliosis treatment may become advisable. Rarely (in 0.2 to 0.5% of all cases), untreated and an especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly. Most cases of scoliosis are mild, but some children develop spine deformities that continue to get more severe as they grow. Severe scoliosis can be disabling.

Types and Causes of Scoliosis

  • Congenital scoliosis. Caused by a bone abnormality present at birth.
  • Neuromuscular scoliosis. In this type of scoliosis, there is a problem when the bones of the spine are formed. Either the bones of the spine fail to form completely or they fail to separate from each other during fetal development. This type of scoliosis develops in people with other disorders, including birth defects, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, or Marfan’s disease. People with these conditions often develop a long C-shaped curve and have weak muscles that are unable to hold them up straight. If the curve is present at birth, it is called congenital. This type of scoliosis is often much more severe and needs more aggressive treatment than other forms of scoliosis.
  • Degenerative scoliosis. Unlike the other forms of scoliosis that are found in children and teens, degenerative scoliosis occurs in older adults. It’s caused by changes in the spine due to arthritis known as spondylosis. Weakening of the normal ligaments and other soft tissues of the spine combined with abnormal bone spurs can lead to an abnormal curvature of the spine. The spine can also be affected by osteoporosis, vertebral compression fractures and disc degeneration. Also may even result from traumatic (from an injury or illness) bone collapse, previous major back surgery or osteoporosis (thinning of the bones).
  • Idiopathic scoliosis. The most common type of scoliosis, idiopathic scoliosis, has no specific identifiable cause. There are many theories but none have been found to be conclusive. There is, however, strong evidence that idiopathic scoliosis is inherited. Treatment of idiopathic scoliosis is based on the age when it develops. In many cases, infantile idiopathic scoliosis will improve without any treatment. X-rays can be obtained and measurements compared on future visits to determine if the curve is getting worse. Bracing is not normally effective in these people. 
  • Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis has the highest risk for getting worse of all of the idiopathic types of scoliosis. Bracing can be tried early if the curve is not very severe. The goal is to prevent the curve from getting worse until the person stops growing. Since the curve starts early in these people, and they have a lot of time left to grow, there is a higher chance for needing more aggressive treatment or surgery.
  • Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common form of scoliosis. If the curve is small when first diagnosed, it can be observed and followed with routine X-rays and measurements. If the curve stays below 25 degrees, no other treatment is needed. You may return to see the doctor every three to four months to check for any worsening of the curve. Additional X-rays may be repeated each year to obtain new measurements and check for progression of the curve. If the curve is between 25-40 degrees and you are still growing, a brace may be recommended. Bracing is not recommended for people who have finished growing. If the curve is greater than 40 degrees, then surgery may be recommended.
  • Functional: In this type of scoliosis, the spine is normal, but an abnormal curve develops because of a problem somewhere else in the body. This could be caused by one leg being shorter than the other or by muscle spasms in the back. 
  • Others: There are other potential causes of scoliosis, including spine tumors such as osteoid osteoma. This is a benign tumor that can occur in the spine and cause pain. The pain causes people to lean to the opposite side to reduce the amount of pressure applied to the tumor. This can lead to a spinal deformity.

Approximately 2% to 3% of Americans at age 16 have scoliosis. Less than 0.1% have spinal curves measuring greater than 40 degrees, which is the point at which surgery becomes a consideration. Overall, girls are more likely to be affected than boys. Idiopathic scoliosis is most commonly a condition of adolescence affecting those ages 10 through 16. Idiopathic scoliosis may progress during the “growth spurt” years, but usually will not progress during adulthood. Often detected by school screenings or regular physician visits.

scoliosis

Signs of Scoliosis

What your Doctor will look for:

  • Curvature of the spine
  • Uneven shoulders, or protrusion of one shoulder blade
  • Asymmetry of the waistline
  • One hip higher than the other.

Once scoliosis is detected, a physician will continue to monitor the curvature. The progression of spinal curvature is very well understood and is measured in degrees.

  • Mild curvature that remains at 20 degrees or less will most likely require monitoring and observation, but further treatment is rarely needed.
  • Curvature greater than 20 degrees may require non-surgical or surgical intervention, including treatments such as a back brace for scoliosis or scoliosis surgery, both of which prevent further progression of the curve.

Preventing severe curvature is important for the physical appearance and health of the patient. Curves greater than 50 degrees are more likely to progress in adulthood. If a curve is allowed to progress to 70 to 90 degrees, it will produce a disfiguring deformity. A high degree of curvature may also put the patient at risk for cardiopulmonary compromise as the curve in the spine rotates the chest and closes down the space available for the lungs and heart.

Symptoms of Scoliosis

  • Uneven shoulders
  • One shoulder blade that appears more prominent than the other
  • Uneven waist
  • One hip higher than the other

If a scoliosis curve gets worse, the spine will also rotate or twist, in addition to curving side to side. This causes the ribs on one side of the body to stick out farther than on the other side. Severe scoliosis can cause back pain and difficulty breathing.

The most common symptom of scoliosis is an abnormal curve of the spine. Often this is a mild change and may be first noticed by scoliosisa friend or family member. The change in the curve of the spine typically occurs very slowly so it is easy to miss until it becomes more severe. Those affected may notice that their clothes do not fit as they did previously or that pant legs are longer on one side than the other. Scoliosis may even cause the head to appear off center or one hip or shoulder to be higher than the opposite side. You may have a more obvious curve on one side of the rib cage on your back from twisting of the vertebrae and ribs. In most cases, scoliosis is not painful, but there are certain types of scoliosis that can cause back pain. Additionally, there are other causes of back pain, which your doctor will want to look for as well. If you think you have scoliosis, you can see your doctor for an examination. The doctor will ask questions, including if there is any family history of scoliosis, or if you have had any pain, weakness, or other medical problems. Your doctor may check your range of motion, muscle strength, and reflexes. 

Treatment for Scoliosis

Treatment of scoliosis is based on the severity of the curve and the chances of the curve getting worse. Certain types of scoliosis have a greater chance of getting worse, so the type of scoliosis also helps to determine the proper treatment. There are three main categories of treatment: observation, bracing, and surgery. In cases with back pain, the symptoms can be lessened with physical therapy, massage, and exercises, including yoga. These can help to strengthen the muscles of the back. They are not, however, a cure for scoliosis and will not be able to correct the abnormal curve.

Remember if the curve stays below 40 degrees until the person is finished growing, it’s not likely to get worse later in life. However, if the curve is greater than 40 degrees, it is likely to continue to get worse by 1-2 degrees each year for the rest of the person’s life. If this is not prevented, the person could eventually be at risk for heart or lung problems. The goals of surgery for scoliosis are correcting and stabilizing the curve, reducing pain and restoring a more normal curve and appearance to the spinal column.

Unlike back braces, which do not correct spinal curves already present, surgery can correct curvature by about 50%. Furthermore, surgery prevents further progression of the curve. There are several approaches to scoliosis surgery, but all use modern instrumentation systems in which hooks and screws are applied to the spine to anchor long rods. The rods are then used to reduce and hold the spine while bone that is added fuses together with existing bone. Once the bone fuses, the spine does not move and the curve cannot progress. The rods are used as a temporary splint to hold the spine in place while the bone fuses together, and after the spine is fused, the bone (not the rods) holds the spine in place.

However, the rods are generally not removed since this is a large surgery and it is not necessary to remove them. Occasionally a rod can irritate the soft tissue around the spine, and if this happens the rod can be removed. If a tumor such as osteoid osteoma is the cause of the scoliosis, surgery to remove the tumor is generally able to correct the curve. There are two general approaches to the scoliosis surgery – a posterior approach (from the back of the spine) and an anterior approach (from the front of the spine). Specific surgery is recommended based on the type and location of the curve. Scoliosis surgery is extensive surgery and is only recommended when scoliosis curves are progressing rapidly enough to potentially cause severe deformity. It’s important for patients to understand the risks of surgery and the post-surgery experience.

Go to your doctor if you notice signs or symptoms of scoliosis in your child. Mild curves, however, can develop without the parent or child knowing it because they appear gradually and usually don’t cause pain. Occasionally, teachers, friends and sports teammates are the first to notice a child’s scoliosis.

Home Remedies for a Sinus Infection

 

home remedies for a sinus infection

Home Remedies for a Sinus Infection

True misery is the pain and swelling caused by sinus inflammation. The bones around the nose, the eyes and the cheeks are lined with membranes that produce mucus, which function to warm and moisten inhaled air, plus to filter out any germs. When congested and unable to drain properly, the mucus continues to accumulate, stagnate and become infected. There are a number of causes for chronic and even acute sinus infections.

Causes for Chronic and Acute Sinus Infections

  • Excessive dairy consumption (cheese, milk, ice cream, yogurt)
  • Environmental allergies
  • Tobacco and pollution irritation
  • Food allergies
  • Dental infection
  • Fungal infection in the sinus cavity
  • Systemic Candida albicans (overgrowth of yeast)
  • Colds and flu symptoms

The Symptoms of Chronic Sinusitis

  • Facial congestion/fullness
  • A nasal obstruction/blockage
  • Pus in the nasal cavity
  • Fever
  • Nasal discharge/discolored postnasal drainage
  • Headaches
  • Bad breath
  • Fatigue
  • Dental pain

These Symptoms can last up to 8 weeks or more!

There are different types of sinusitis, including:

  • Acute sinusitis: A sudden onset of cold-like symptoms such as runny, stuffy nose and facial pain that does not go away after 10 to 14 days. Acute sinusitis typically lasts 4 weeks or less.
  • Sub acute sinusitis: An inflammation lasting 4 to 8 weeks.
  • Chronic sinusitis: A condition characterized by sinus inflammation symptoms lasting 8 weeks or longer.
  • Recurrent sinusitis: Several attacks within a year.

About 37 million Americans suffer from at least one episode of sinusitis each year. People who have the following conditions have a higher risk of sinusitis:

  • Nasal mucous membrane swelling as from a common cold
  • Blockage of drainage ducts
  • Structural differences that narrow the drainage ducts
  • Nasal polyps
  • Conditions that result in an increased risk of infection such as immune deficiencies or taking medications that suppress the immune system.

In children, common environmental factors that contribute to sinusitis include allergies, illness from other children at day care or school, pacifiers, bottle drinking while lying on one’s back, and smoke in the environment. In adults, the contributing factors are most frequently infections and smoking. Whether it’s acute or chronic, sinusitis is painful and wearying. It’s common too: every year, it affects 37 million people in the U.S. and costs us $5.7 billion. But despite its pervasiveness, it’s also widely misunderstood. Many people with sinusitis wind up with the wrong diagnosis or use treatments that aren’t likely to help.

Some of the Primary Symptoms of Acute Sinusitis

  • Facial pain/pressure
  • Nasal stuffiness
  • Nasal discharge
  • Loss of smell
  • Cough/congestion
  • Fever
  • Bad breath
  • Fatigue
  • Dental pain

Acute sinusitis may be diagnosed when a person has two or more symptoms and/or the presence of thick, green or even yellow nasal discharge. The symptoms of acute and chronic sinusitis are similar. The good news is that, regardless of the type of sinusitis, treatments can help. The key is to figure out what’s really causing the underlying problem. For instance, if your case of sinusitis is caused by allergies, decongestants alone will probably not help much. If you have sinusitis symptoms for more than a couple of days, check in with your doctor. With a good exam — and sometimes imaging tests, like X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs — you may be able to figure out exactly what’s causing the problem. Often, the best sinusitis treatment is a combination of different approaches — typically medication combined with self-care. Home care can help open the sinuses and alleviate their dryness. Here are some great and effective Home Remedies to help sooth or even cure your sinus infection. You choose which ones best suits you and if you have any of your own, please share with us! Thank you and hope you feel better soon.

1. Spice It Up

We are going to start off with one of the best Home Remedies for a Sinus Infection. To dissolve excess mucus spicy foods such as cayenne pepper or horseradish can be mixed with apple cider vinegar and lemon juice to create a mucus dissolving elixir. Try a few times to break up that mucus!

2. Grapefruit Seed Extract

This citrus extract is a powerful natural antibiotic and is used to inhibit microbes, parasites, bacteria, viruses and 30 types of fungi including Candida yeast. GSE helps to clear out mucus and may prevent other microbial contaminants from taking root in weakened and inflamed sinus tissues. For sinus infections you can purchase Grapefruit Seed Extract as a nasal spray and use it as an adjunct to your treatment protocol.

3. Steam Inhalation

Break up thick mucus with a few drops of Eucalyptus or Peppermint oil in hot water. With your face down over the water, drape a towel over the back of your head and inhale the steam. Do this at least two to four times per day. Taking a hot, steamy shower may also work. Mentholated preparations, such as Vicks Vapo-Rub, can also be added to the water or vaporizer to aid in opening the passageways. A Great Remedy to help break up that mucus!

4. Apple Cider Vinegar

At the first sign of infection take two or three tablespoons of raw, unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar and add it to a cup of hot water or tea, doing this three times daily will help thin out excessive mucus relieving congestion an sinus pressure. Mix with lemon and honey or Stevia to taste. Apple cider vinegar is a wonderful natural ingredient with a huge array of health benefits.

5. Vitamin C to help boost your Immune System

Available as caplets, liquid, chewables (as well as some other forms), Vitamin C is perhaps the most popular over-the-counter immune booster. Studies have shown us that Vitamin C helps the body to resist immune system deficiencies and improves overall health. Vitamin C is an excellent immune booster, and can help to fend off sinus infections. Try taking up to 1000 mg of vitamin C 1-3 times daily.

6. Neti-pot

Dissolve a teaspoon of sea salt in 2 cups of warm water. Standing over a sink fill the neti pot with one cup of water and place the tip of the spout into one nostril. Tilt your head to the side and allow the water to run out through the opposite nostril. Careful not to tilt your head back and up or the water will reroute down your throat. Refill the neti pot and repeat with the other nostril.

7. Turmeric / Ginger Root

Turmeric root is a wonderful, fragrant spice commonly found in Indian and some Middle eastern dishes.  Not only does Turmeric contain the natural anti-inflammatory cur cumin, this spice is also an anti-oxidant.  When combined with spicy ginger root and brewed for hot tea, this combination can help loosen mucus from clogged nasal passages, alleviate sinus pressure, and make you feel better all around.  Ginger root also has the added bonus of calming an upset stomach – a frequent side-effect of excessive nighttime sinus drainage.

8. Get Plenty of Fluids

Drink plenty of water, no sugar added juices, clear broth, and hot tea. These fluids will help to thin out mucus and help to drain it from irritated sinuses. Avoid drinking alcohol, caffeine, and sugary beverages, as well as from smoking. All of these substances will dehydrate your system causing mucus to thicken and clog already inflamed airways. Drinking water regularly can keep a person away from any forms of nasal and sinus infection. Water can wash up mucus on the throat. It carries away any forms of bacteria and fungal build-ups. You can also avoid this infection by checking the food that he eats.

9. Add some Heat

Apply warm compresses to your face multiple times daily for 5 minutes each. Taking nice hot showers and even bathes to help you relax can be beneficial.

10. Sleep it Off

It’s always important to get plenty of rest, but be sure to always get plenty of rest when sick. Take you a nap if possible. Sleeping it off will help you recover faster and elevate your head while sleeping.

11. Oregano Oil 

While it may not be the most accessible of the home remedies for a sinus infection, oregano oil can be an effective sinus infection treatment. Not only could you simply ingest the oregano oil, but the oil can also be steamed and inhaled over a stove (with eyes closed). In addition to being a potential treatment for sinus infection, oregano oil benefits may also help to improve digestion, aid in fighting infections, and improve biological function – especially in the liver and colon.

12. Herbs

Herbs like garlic, cayenne pepper, horseradish and onion have to be included in meals, as this helps in elimination of mucus.

13. Watch your Diet

The afflicted person must stick to a moderate diet that includes beans, whole grains, lentils, cold-pressed oils and lightly-cooked vegetables. Foods such as chocolate, egg and dairy products, to cite a few, have to be avoided. Also, lot of water has to be taken.

Back Pain Relief During Pregnancy

Back Pain Relief During Pregnancy

Back Pain Relief During Pregnancy

During pregnancy, approximately 50-70 percent of women experience back pain. While reasons behind the back pain may vary, the majority are due to increased hormones, a change in the body’s center of gravity, gaining additional weight, a change in posture and added stress. Back pain during pregnancy isn’t surprising, but it still deserves attention. You can probably blame your growing uterus and hormonal changes for your aching back. Your expanding uterus shifts your center of gravity and stretches out and weakens your abdominal muscles, changing your posture and putting strain on your back.

It may also cause back pain if it’s pressing on a nerve. In addition, the extra weight you’re carrying means more work for your muscles and increased stress on your joints, which is why your back may feel worse at the end of the day. The hormonal changes in pregnancy loosen your joints and the ligaments that attach your pelvic bones to your spine. This can make you feel less stable and cause pain when you walk, stand, sit for long periods, roll over in bed, get out of a low chair or the tub, bend or even lift things.

As many as three-quarters of pregnant women experience back pain at some point. Most often the pain appears in the later months or becomes worse as pregnancy progresses. It may also even persist after the baby arrives, but postpartum back pain usually resolves in a few months.

The good news is, your baby is growing. That’s exactly what should be happening — but it can still be tough on your back. You’ve got lots of company — most pregnant women experience back pain, usually starting in the second half of pregnancy. Back pain during pregnancy is a common complaint — and it’s no wonder. You’re gaining weight, your center of gravity changes and your hormones are relaxing the ligaments in your pelvis. Often, however, you can prevent or ease back pain during pregnancy. Back Pain Relief During Pregnancy

What kind of lower back pain is common in pregnancy?

When your nice baby grows up within you, the lower spine turned inwards to support your baby‘s weight. At the same time your breast enlarged and your top spine slightly curved to support breast enlargement. Such temporary alteration of your spine can cause lower and top back pain.

In preparation for the birthing process of your baby, your body secretes a hormone named ”Relaxin” which soften your body ,joints, ligaments and tissues for moving of your body parts more easily. But weight of you with your baby is quite more than normal to you. Your soft body experienced pain in carrying out that weight. The weight of your growing baby and uterus also puts pressure to your blood vessels and nerves of your pelvis and back which can cause back pain.

Experts describe two common patterns of lower back pain in pregnancy: Lumbar pain, which occurs in the area of the lumbar vertebrae in your lower back, and posterior pelvic pain is also felt in the back of your pelvis. Some women have symptoms of both types of low back pain.

Lumbar pain is like the low back pain you may have experienced before you were pregnant. You feel it over and around your spine approximately at the level of your waist. You might also have pain that radiates to your legs. Sitting or standing for long periods of time and lifting can make it worse and it tends to be more intense at the end of the day.

Even more pregnant women have posterior pelvic pain, which is felt lower on your body than lumbar pain. You may feel it deep inside the buttocks, on one or both sides or the back of your thighs. It may be triggered by activities such as walking, climbing stairs, getting in and out of a tub or a low chair, rolling over in bed or twisting and lifting.

Positions in which you’re bent at the waist – such as sitting in a chair and leaning forward while working at a desk – may sometimes make posterior pelvic pain worse. Women with posterior pelvic pain are also more likely to have pain over their pubic bone.

How to get Back Pain Relief during Pregnancy?

Try to use your body more efficiently. Stand up straight and tall, ensuring your chin isn’t tilting upwards. Avoid standing for too long in one position. If your job involves standing for long periods, keep changing from one back pain relief during pregnancyfoot to the other, sit down when you can and try to take a walk at lunchtime.

Use plenty of pillows in bed for support, keeping your thighs parallel. This prevents your top leg from twisting across your body into the recovery position while you sleep. To get out of bed, roll on to one side and push yourself up to a sitting position, then slowly stand up.

Rather than carrying heavy shopping, shop online, or ask a friend to help you. If you have a toddler, try not to carry her on one hip, as this puts a strain on your back. Ask for help with housework, and ask a colleague to help if any tasks at work strain your back. Wear comfortable shoes with broad supporting heels and straps to prevent your feet from slipping about and your ankles from becoming twisted.

Wear the right size of supportive maternity bra. Make sure the straps are wide enough and the cups are big enough to avoid extra strain on your shoulders and ribcage. At work, and when driving, consider a lumbar support for your chair. Try not to cross your legs and check that the position of your computer screen and chair is correct. Try to move away from your desk regularly and get fresh air at lunchtime.

There are things you can do to minimize your back pain. Consider these seven ways to relieve back pain during pregnancy, from good posture to physical activity. Here’s what can help!

Exercising for Back Pain Relief during Pregnancy

back pain relief during pregnancy

You may feel more like curling up in bed than exercising if your back hurts and even during these months of pregnancies, but don’t take to your bed for long periods. Bed rest is generally not helpful in the long run for lower back pain and even labor and can may even make you feel worse. In fact, exercise may be just what you need.

Regular exercise strengthens muscles and boosts flexibility. That can ease the stress on your spine. Safe exercises for pregnant women include walking, swimming and stationary cycling. Exercising does wonders during pregnancy. It boosts mood, improves sleep and reduces pregnancy aches and pains. It helps prevent and treat gestational diabetes and may keep preeclampsia at bay. It prepares you for childbirth by strengthening muscles and building endurance, and makes it much easier to get back in shape after your baby is born. Make sure you consult your healthcare provider before embarking on any exercise regimen.

Swimming: Healthcare providers and fitness experts hail swimming as the best and safest exercise for pregnant women. Swimming is ideal because it exercises both large muscle groups (arms and legs), provides cardiovascular benefits and allows expectant women to feel weightless despite the extra pounds.

Walking: One of the best cardiovascular exercises for pregnant women, walking keeps you fit without jarring your knees and ankles. It’s also easy to do almost anywhere, doesn’t require any equipment beyond a good pair of supportive shoes and is safe throughout all nine months of pregnancy.

Low-impact aerobics: Aerobic exercise strengthens your heart and tones your body. And if you take a class for pregnant women, you’ll enjoy the camaraderie of other moms-to-be and feel reassured that each movement is safe for you and your baby.

Stretching: Stretching is wonderful for keeping your body limber and relaxed and preventing muscle strain. Add stretching to your cardiovascular exercises to get a complete workout.

Yoga: Yoga can help maintain muscle tone and keep you flexible with little if any impact on your joints. But you may have to augment a yoga regimen with walking or swimming several times a week to give your heart a workout.

Weight training: If weight training is already part of your exercise routine, there’s no reason to stop, although most women should reduce the amount of weight they’re lifting (you can do more repetitions to ensure that you’re still getting a good workout). If you take the necessary precautions and use good technique (meaning slow, controlled movements), weight training is a great way to tone and strengthen your muscles.

Good Posture for Back Pain Relief during Pregnancy

As your baby grows, your center of gravity shifts forward. To avoid falling forward, you might compensate byback pain during pregnancy leaning back which can strain the muscles in your lower back and contribute to back pain during pregnancy. Keep these principles of good posture in mind:

  • Stand up straight and tall.
  • Hold your chest high.
  • Keep your shoulders back and relaxed.
  • Don’t lock your knees.

Slouching strains your spine. So using proper posture when working, sitting or sleeping is a good move. For example, sleeping on your side with a pillow between the knees will take stress off your back. When sitting at a desk, place a rolled-up towel behind your back for support, rest your feet on a stack of books or stool and sit up straight, with your shoulders back. 

When backache persists after you are in bed for the night, shift your body into a more back-friendly position. Sleeping on your side and using strategically placed pillows for support can provide relief from aches and pains, and help you get some much-needed rest. 

The right gear to help get Back Pain Relief during Pregnancy

Wear low-heeled not flat shoes with good arch support. You might also consider wearing a maternity support belt. Although research on the effectiveness of maternity support belts is limited, some women find the additional support helpful. These thick elastic bands worn around the hips and under the belly cradle and back pain during pregnancysupport lax abdominal muscles. Especially helpful if your job requires you to stand for long periods of time, wearing a maternity belt can improve posture and decrease lower back pressure. Some women say they can’t get by without one! 

Lift properly! When lifting a small object, squat down and lift with your legs. Don’t bend at the waist or lift with your back. It’s also important to know your limits. Ask for help if you need it.

Lumbar Support Pillows – Does your desk job require you to sit for hours? Good posture is just as important while sitting down as it is when you are standing upright. Keep your head and shoulders in line and use a lumbar support pillow (a small pillow specially designed to fit the lower back) to keep your back properly positioned and pain-free.

TLC for Back Pain Relief during Pregnancy

back pain during pregnancy

Taking steps to ease soreness and tension and generally taking good care of yourself can’t hurt. At the very least, you’ll feel better temporarily. Take the time to try these measures to help get back pain relief during pregnancy:

  • Learn relaxation techniques. They may help you cope with the discomfort and may be especially useful at bedtime if your back pain is just one more thing that makes it hard to get to sleep.
  • Try heat or cold. There’s some evidence that heat may provide a bit of short-term relief. Try soaking in a warm (not hot) tub, which can also help you relax. Or place a hot water bottle (or hot pack) on your lower back. Although there’s no hard evidence that cold helps, applying a cold pack is easy to do and worth a try if heat doesn’t work for you.Whether you use heat or cold, cover the pack or bottle with a thin cloth to protect your skin.
  • Relaxing in a warm bath with no more than two or three drops of lavender or ylang ylang essential oils may help to ease your muscle pain. However, lavender oil should be used only occasionally in your first trimester, as it may stimulate contractions
  • Treat yourself to a massage. A Prenatal massage by a trained therapist may provide some relief. If your insurance plan doesn’t cover therapeutic massage and paying for one will strain your finances, you may want to enlist your partner or a friend to give you a gentle backrub – it may not address the underlying problem, but it might help you relax. (Most insurance companies don’t cover massage, though a referral from your caregiver might do the trick. It’s worth looking into.)

If you continue to have severe back pain during pregnancy or back pain that lasts more than two weeks, talk to your health care provider. He or she might recommend medication such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or other treatments.

Keep in mind that back pain during pregnancy might be a sign of preterm labor. Also, back pain during pregnancy that’s accompanied by vaginal bleeding, fever or burning during urination could be a sign of an underlying problem that needs prompt attention. If you’re concerned about your back pain, contact your health care provider right away.