5 Ways To Ease Lower Back Pain

5 Ways To Ease Lower Back Pain

lower back pain Most lower back pain is the result of an injury, such as muscle sprains or strains due to sudden movements or poor body mechanics while lifting heavy objects. But lower back pain can also be caused by certain diseases, such as cancer of the spinal cord, ruptured or herniated disc, sciatica, arthritis, kidney infections or infections of the spine. Acute back pain can last anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, while chronic back pain is pain that lasts longer than three months.

Lower back pain is more likely to occur in individuals between the ages of 30 and 50. This is partly due to the changes that occur in the body with aging. As you grow older, the fluid content between the vertebrae in the spine becomes reduced, which means discs in the spine are more easily irritated. Some muscle tone is also lost, which makes the back more prone to injury. This is why strengthening your back muscles and using good body mechanics and exercises are helpful in preventing lower back pain.

Why So Painful?

So why is the lower back a target area for pain? Generally speaking, the lower back is subject to a lot of mechanical lower back painstress and strain. The reason is the weight of the upper body, which always puts loads on the lower back.

Supporting all that upper body weight is the spine, which is made up of more than 30 small bones called vertebrae stacked one on top of the other. A spongy piece of cartilage, called a disc, sits between each vertebra. It acts as a shock absorber, preventing the bony vertebrae from grinding against one another.

With age, these cushioning discs gradually wear away and shrink, a condition known as degenerative disc disease. Discs can also tear or become injured. Sometimes the weakening of a disc can put pressure on its jelly-like center, as similar to a bubble forming on your car’s tire. You hit a bump in the road, then all of a sudden that tire goes pop. In the lower back paincase of your back, that pressure can lead to a herniated disc (also called a “slipped disc” or “ruptured disc”), in which the center of the disc bulges. Sometimes that bulging causes the material from inside the disc to press on the sensitive nerves that carry messages to the brain. The result can be the kind of excruciating pain. A herniated disc in the lower back can put pressure on the nerve that extends down the spinal column. This commonly causes pain to radiate to the buttocks and all the way down the leg. This condition is called sciatica.

Here Are 5 Ways to Ease Lower Back Pain

If you sit in an uncomfortable chair all day, work a jackhammer or regularly twist your body into uncomfortable positions, your lower back will suffer for it. Smoking — the bad habit that increases the risk of dozens of diseases — can also lead to backaches. One study found that smokers are nearly a third more likely to have lower back pain compared to nonsmokers.

Try these five ways to prevent or ease lower back pain

lower back pain

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If you smoke, get help to kick the habit.

lower back pain

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Practice good posture whenever you sit or stand. When lifting something, lift with your knees, not with your back.

lower back pain

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Do exercises to strengthen the muscles that support your back — especially the abdominals, hips, back, and pelvic area. Developing strong core muscles can make a big difference in how you feel.

lower back pain

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Fight the urge to crawl into bed whenever your lower back acts up. “Our bodies are meant to be used so If you have pain, the first thing you do is lay down, but that can actually make it worse. It’s best to stay active and try to apply the appropriate exercises. We recommend Doctors Pain Relief Systems.

lower back pain

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If your back pain get to severe see your doctor and get treated for lower back pain early on, so you can stay moving and keep active.

You Don’t Really Have Sciatica…

Did you know that Sciatica tends to be the most overused “diagnosis” with patients and family doctors?  For years now… the majority of patients that come into my office for low back pain, tell me that they have sciatica.  When in reality, they have absolutely no symptoms of sciatica.  Unfortunately,  most of them tell me that it was their family doctor that gave them this mis-diagnosis. 

Sciatica Pain







What is Sciatica?

The term sciatica can include a number of different resulting conditions all stemming from a root cause… the sciatic nerve.  This is usually caused by chronic irritation of one or more of the spinal nerves L4 – S4. The usual causes are trauma to the inter-vertebral discs associated with the roots of spinal nerves L4 _ S4, but a number of other causes, including improperly administered hypodermic injections into the gluteal muscle, have been documented. Whatever the cause, sciatica is characterized by pain along the course of the sciatic nerve through the hip and down the back of the leg.
Pressure, either chronic or acute, applied to the sciatic nerve’s dorsal and/or ventral roots may result in a number of symptoms in addition to pain.

  • Weakness in the lower leg muscles.
  • Inability of the lower leg muscles to control the ankle and foot can result in impaired gait due to foot drop.
  • Sensory disturbances such as paresthesia (a tingling or “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Hyperesthesia (increased or extreme sensitivity of receptors, particularly touch, temperature, and pain receptors).
  • Severe sciatica can even result in wasting of the muscles of the lower leg.


How Do You Know If You Have It?

You will feel a burning sensation, numbness, or tingling radiating from the lower back and upper buttock down the back of the hamstrings to the back of the calf muscles.  Walking can be almost impossible because every time you extend your leg forward the sciatic nerve becomes stretched and produces immediate pain.  This is where a lot of people come in to my office misdiagnosed.  Their pain will be isolated to the low back only, or the pain travels to the groin or down the front of the leg.


Sciatica Treatment


What Does It Feel Like

• Shooting pain when walking or bending at the waist.

• Sharp stabbing pains when moving the legs in certain positions.

• Pain when lying down, sitting, standing, walking, etc.

• Numbness in the feet and toes.

• Trouble controlling limb, loss of balance.

• Legs collapsing out from under you.


Yoga For Sciatica


What Can You Do Sciatica

Apply heat or ice to the painful area. Refrain from normal activity to reduce inflammation. You may want to take over-the-counter pain relievers if you have no allergies to them, including ibuprofen.  Avoid shoes with elevated heels.  Follow the protocol outlined in the Doctor’s Back Pain System™ that I provide.  In most cases, after only a few minutes of specific stretches, you’ll notice immediate relief.  Keep in mind, this relief will be short lived at least until we work on correcting the muscle imbalances that created the problem to begin with.  Doctor’s Back Pain System™ is the key for Cracking The Code For Chronic Pain™.


Yours in health,

Dr Jason Hurst, DC

Back Pain Treatment



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