Osteoarthritis Symptoms-Causes-Treatments-Risk

Osteoarthritis Symptoms-Causes-Treatments-Risk

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common arthritis. Osteoarthritis can be caused by a number of different things such as aging joints, injury, and obesity. Osteoarthritis symptoms include joint pain and stiffness. Treatment depends on the affected joint, including the hand, wrist, neck, back, knee, and hip, and often involves medication and exercise. If you weight is the cause of your OA, weight loss can help your symptoms. In this article, we’ll explore osteoarthritis symptoms, causes and treatments.

Cartilage is a firm, slippery tissue that permits nearly frictionless joint motion. In osteoarthritis, the slick surface of the cartilage becomes rough. Eventually, if the cartilage wears down completely, you may be left with bone rubbing on bone. There’s a lot of different risk factors that are attached to osteoarthritis. We typically see osteoarthritis found more in women then men. Bone deformities can also increase your risk for OA. As we mentioned earlier, both aging and obesity can cause osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis affects a lot of people across the world. Nearly 27 million people in America alone have osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis Symptoms

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Your joints can hurt during and after physical activity.
  • Tenderness. Your joints may feel sore and tender when pressure is applied.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness may be most noticeable when you wake up in the morning or after a period of inactivity.
  • Loss of flexibility. You may not be able to move your joints as they should be able to move.
  • Grating sensation. You may hear or feel a grating sensation when you use the joint.
  • Bone spurs. These bone spurs, which are pieces of bone that form lumps, may appear around the affected joints.

Ostoarthritis

There’s several different symptoms that may suggest that you have osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints. Unlike many other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus, osteoarthritis does not affect other organs of the body. This type of osteoarthritis is limited to your joints.

The most common symptom of osteoarthritis is pain in the affected joints after repetitive use. Joint pain is usually worse in the evening hours. You may experience swelling, warmth, and discomfort of the affected joints. Pain and stiffness of the joints can also occur after long periods of inactivity. You may experience these symptoms while sitting for hours. The longer the duration, the worse symptoms can get.  In severe osteoarthritis, complete loss of cartilage causes friction between bones, causing pain at rest or pain with limited motion. This can cause mile/extreme pain and discomfort.

Osteoarthritis symptoms can vary from one person to the next. Some patients can have severe mobility issues and pain. Completely opposite, others may have few symptoms if any despite severe degeneration of the joints shown by X-ray. Symptoms also can be intermittent. It is not unusual for patients with osteoarthritis of the hands and knees to have years of pain-free intervals between symptoms.

Osteoarthritis of the knees is often associated with obesity or a history of repeated injury and/or joint surgery. We see this a lot in sports and athletics. Progressive cartilage degeneration of the knee joints can lead to deformity and outward curvature of the knees referred to as “bow legged.” Patients with osteoarthritis of the weight bearing joints (like the knees) can develop a limp. The limping can worsen as more cartilage degenerates. In some patients, the pain, limping, and joint dysfunction may not respond to medications or other conservative measures. Therefore, severe osteoarthritis of the knees is one of the most common reasons for total knee replacement surgical procedures in the U.S.

Osteoarthritis of the spine causes pain in the neck or low back. Bony spurs that form along the arthritic spine can irritate spinal nerves, causing severe pain, numbness, and tingling of the affected parts of the body.

Osteoarthritis causes the formation of hard bony enlargements of the small joints of the fingers. Classic bony enlargement of the small joint at the end of the fingers is called a Heberden’s node, named after a British doctor. The bony deformity is a result of the bone spurs from the osteoarthritis in that joint. Another common bony knob (node) occurs at the middle joint of the fingers in many patients with osteoarthritis and is called a Bouchard’s node, named after a French doctor who studied arthritis patients in the late 1800s. The Heberden’s and Bouchard’s nodes may not be painful, but they are often associated with limitation of motion of the joint. The characteristic appearances of these finger nodes can be helpful in diagnosing osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis of the joint at the base of the big toes leads to the formation of a bunion. Osteoarthritis of the fingers and the toes may have a genetic basis, and can be found in many female members of some families.

Osteoarthritis Treatments

There’s several different osteoarthritis treatments that can be used to relieve your pain. The type of OA treatment depends on the location of your osteoarthritis. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, but there are medications to help relieve pain, when needed. The doctor may recommend physical therapy (PT) or occupational therapy (OT) to help improve strength and function. When pain is severe and frequent or mobility and daily activities become difficult, surgery may be considered.

Exercise, massage, hot/cold treatments and Yoga are all options for those who suffer from osteoarthritis. 

Spinal Osteoarthritis Treatments

Spinal osteoarthritis is arthritis that affects the spine. Even though there’s not a cure for osteoarthritis to date, there are treatments out there that can help you with your back pain. The Doctor’s Back Pain Systems is a powerful back pain system that relieves spinal osteoarthritis. If you do suffer from spinal osteoarthritis, be sure to take the time to sign up for our free pain relief webinar. Just scroll to the top of your page and fill out the form on the right. It only takes a second and I promise you won’t regret it.

Natural Knee Pain Treatments

Do You Suffer From Knee Pain?

Knee Pain TreatmentsKnee pain is one of the most common complaints that we see among our patients next to back pain. The knees serve a variety of different purposes, from support to mobility. Knee pain can be caused by many different elements. The knees rely on a number of structures that include the bones, ligaments, tendons and cartilage to perform all the task we ask of. Damage to anyone of these areas can cause knee pain.

Just as with most injuries, knee injuries often become inflamed which leads to more pain. The inflammation in your knee has to be controlled and reversed before your pain can reside. If you’ve injured your knee, it’s probably inflamed. You need to start tacking the inflammation first to control the pain in your knees. With knee injuries, it’s important to understand the value of resting your knees. At this point of your knee injury, mobility is the least important. You want to make sure you rest your knee for prolong periods at a time.

Ice is going to play a vital role in controlling your knee pain. Since inflammation causes pain, we want to apply ice to the knee. Ice is going to reduce the swelling and inflammation in your knee. As for duration, I recommend icing your knee 2-3 times a day, no longer then 30 minutes. Make sure you stay with the ice and don’t switch back and forth from ice to hot water. This pain treatment method can actually make your knee pain worse, so make sure you stick with the ice.

Knee pain can also be caused by arthritis. There’s a variety of different types of arthritis that can affect the knees. Rheumatoid arthritis is a connective tissue diseases of the whole body that affects many joints often including the knee. People who have this disease often have family members who suffer from it as well. Crystalline arthritis and Rheumatoid arthritis are two other types of arthritis that can cause pain in the knees.

 

Now, another way to manage your knee pain is with compression techniques. I want you to take a wrap or bandage and wrap it around your knee. This can help you reduce your pain, increase mobility and help control inflammation. Over the counter medications can also help you with pain and inflammation. I would suggest Motrin because it will help your pain and inflammation all at once.

Elevating your knee is another great idea to relieve knee pain. It’s recommended that you elevate your knee higher then your heart level. You should be resting your leg as much as possible anyway. By doing so, this will help relieve your knee pain and also inflammation. It’s quite possible that you may feel numbness or tingling in your legs when you’re elevating your knees, just know that this is a normal reaction to have. The key is to drain all fluids back into circulation.

Now, if you continue to experience knee pain or you can’t put weight on your knee, you’re going to want to go to the doctor. The body is fragile and it doesn’t take much for the knee to be injured. Remember what we walked about earlier, the knees rely on a number of structures that include the bones, ligaments, tendons and cartilage. Any injury to these areas can cause severe knee pain and injuries that may require surgery to fix. You don’t want to wait too long because if left untreated, your injury can get worse. If your knee or leg looks deformed in any way, we recommend that you go to the emergency room as soon as possible. These types of injuries can also cause the need for knee joint replacements.

If you have had prolong knee pain, you may want to consider our pain relief treatment. We’ve helped thousands of men and women relieve and end their pain for good. Take the time to review all our different pain relief treatments as we have several to choose from. Knee pain can be tricky, especially if you haven’t had a recent injury or trauma to the knee. If you can remember a prior injury to your knee, it’s possible that it healed wrong and it can be the cause of your pain. If you have any questions about your knee pain or your options, be sure to leave me a message. I’d be glad to help you in any way that I can. Remember, rest, ice compression and elevation.

 

Walking Makes Back Pain Worse!

Yes, walking can make your back pain worse.  Many doctors will recommend that you walk regularly to alleviate your back pain, but for certain conditions walking will only hurt you more.  Let me explain…

If you’re experiencing Sciatica then every time you step forward with the affected leg, you’re stretching the sciatic nerve which will only inflame your condition.  Walking will get the muscles to loosen up some, but after you are finished with your exercise then the inflammation sets in and you’ll feel worse later in the day.

The same thing goes for a herniated or bulging disc.  The compression of your spinal bones on the disc actually pushes harder on the disc inflaming the surrounding joints and nerves.

 

So when can you begin walking?

That depends on many factors.  If your pain is isolated to your low back only then walking short distances is O.K. as long as you don’t normally have pain when you’re standing or walking short distances.  However, if you have pain in your lower back when you stand, then you should refrain from walking until you correct the muscular and postural imbalances around your spine.

You see, any activity can flare up your low back pain if you have muscular imbalances in your body.  If you continue to ignore these issues, then over time your condition will get worse… to the point that a spinal surgery is your only option.

I know that some people hate exercise so much that they would rather just have the surgery instead.  Unfortunately, the reason that surgery fails so frequently is that the surgeons never addressed the postural and muscular imbalances in the first place… and now after your surgery, you have even more instability in your spine than before.  YES… even after a spinal fusion, your low back is more unstable than before.  That’s why the surgeons even tell you prior to the surgery that it’s likely that the discs above and below the fusion will get bad within the next few years.  And guess where they send you next?

To the physical therapist!

So this person had the surgery to avoid exercising and fixing the problem on their own, and then they still have to go to physical therapy afterwards… often for months!

 

So how can you fix these imbalances on your own?

These are just a few of the things that can be going wrong…

  • You may have over pronated feet
  • You may have foot flare from tight external rotators of the hips
  • You may have tight hamstrings
  • You may have weak quadriceps
  • You may have tight calves
  • You may have tight iliopsoas
  • You may have weak abdominals
  • You may have tight low back erectors
  • You may have weak gluteal muscles
  • You may have tight piriformis muscles

Now if you have no clue how to identify any of these problems, then how are you going to correct them?  Well, using the Doctor’s Back Pain System is the number one method available that addresses each of these issues.  There are audios, videos, and manuals with pictures included that help you identify your own personal imbalances so you can fix them without spending months going through physical therapy.  There are basically 3 different types of muscular imbalances.  Once I help you identify your specific pattern, then all you have to do is follow the recommended action plan that’s included in the system.  All 3 patterns are included so there is nothing more that you’ll need.

Now… If you think your pain isn’t that bad and you’re ready for walking then the best thing you can do is to walk on a treadmill.  This decreases the impact on your feet and legs… But not everybody has access to a treadmill.  So the next best thing is to walk outside near your house.

The biggest mistake my patients have made in the past is that they walk too far away from their home.  What happens if you walk a half mile in one direction from your house and then the pain sets in?  How will you get back home without making your symptoms worse?

I always tell my patients to only walk around one block in their neighborhood.  Keep the distance from your home very short so if you get in trouble with pain, you won’t have far to get back home.  Now if you get back to your house and you’re feeling great, then walk around the block again… and again if you can.

If you live out on a country road, then walk 1/8 or 1/4 mile in one direction… turn around, and walk back to your house.  Then go 1/8 to 1/4 mile in the other direction.  Just keep going back and forth in front of your house, again so you won’t be stuck too far away from home if you all of a sudden experience pain.

My best advice to you about walking is… Take is slow!!!

The conveniences in life have made it far too easy on us to the point that we don’t even realize how easy we have it.

Let me explain…

We never have to walk a distance that allows pain to flare up.  Think about this for a minute… you walk from your bed to the bathroom, to the kitchen, to the couch, back to the kitchen, back to the bathroom, back to the couch.

What about when you’re running errands?  You walk from the house to the car, from the car to the store, from the store back to the car, and from the car back to the house… And the entire time you’re walking on concrete, pavement, carpet or some other flat flooring.  You never have to walk very far and you never have to walk on an unstable surface.

That’s why so many people injure, or re-injure their back when they are at the airport.  Unless you get carted around in a wheel chair, you may have to walk up to a mile or more just going from the parking garage to the terminals.

So just because you think you’re ready for walking long distances, doesn’t mean you are ready.  And that’s why I’m telling you that WALKING MAKES BACK PAIN WORSE… If not done carefully, and at the right time.

Don’t forget, almost every one of us has muscle imbalances in our bodies.  When these imbalances become chronic over time then the question isn’t “if your in pain,” it’s “when will you be in pain?”  It’s a guarantee that pain will hit you again down the road if you don’t address the cause of your problems first.

Sign up for my FREE WEBINAR that explains it all.  The registration form is on the upper right side of the page you’re reading right now. ==>

Yours in health,

Dr Jason Hurst, DC, CCSP, CSCS

 

 

 

Get “Uncle Arthur” Out Of Your Life! Treating Arthritis

How To Prevent and Treat Arthritic Pain

Over 50 million people in the U.S. suffer from Arthritis!

That’s approximately 1 in 7 Americans afflicted with this potentially crippling disease… and nearly all Americans over the age of 50 show varying degrees of Arthritis symptoms.  Doesn’t that sound alarming?

So… What is Arthritis?

Well, Arthritis comes from the Greek word “arthro” meaning joint and “itis” meaning inflammation.  To break it down even better, that means “inflammation of the joints.”

Here are some of the warning signs:

  • Joint pain not due to an injury
  • Your skin around your joints may appear red, swollen and even very warm to the touch.
  • Pain that occurs during or after movement or after extended periods of inactivity.
  • Joints may feel stiff and difficult to move.
  • Grinding or popping when you move your body
  • Deformity of your joints

Now, the most common form of arthritis is Osteoarthritis.  It involves the breakdown of the cartilage and bone at the joints, causing some or all of the aforementioned warning signs.

It can be broken down into 2 types:  Primary and Secondary

Primary osteoarthritis is the most common form.    It’s a slow, progressive condition that usually strikes after age 45. (However, in my office, patients today are complaining of Arthritis pain before the age of 30!)

The most common areas Osteoarthritis:

  • Knees
  • Hips
  • Lower back
  • Neck
  • Fingers

Primary Osteoarthritis begins to develop when excessive or repetitive stress is put on ordinary, healthy joint tissues, or when normal amounts of stress are applied to an already weakened joint.  Studies have shown that obesity and a family history of Arthritis can put a person at greater risk for Primary Osteoarthritis.

Secondary Osteoarthritis usually strikes a person before the age of 40, and is known to be primarily caused by trauma to the joint.  This trauma can be received from a sudden injury, such as a car accident, a fall, degeneration after a surgery, repetitive sports injuries, or it can be caused by many small injuries to a joint over time.

Now, beyond Osteoarthritis there are rheumatic diseases that cause different forms of Arthritis with symptoms ranging from inflammation in one or more joints, to inflammation spreading to the muscles, tendons, ligaments, internal organs, and even the skin.  Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease brought on when the immune system attacks the body’s own tissue in the joints as if it were a foreign material.  Rheumatoid Arthritis affects more than 2 million people in the US, and women are 3 times as likely to get it as men.  It usually sets in between the ages of 20 and 40, but does not discriminate against older people or children.  However…one can take steps to prevent all forms of Arthritis and protect oneself from further joint damage.

There are four warning signs of potential Arthritic development.

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Restrictive range of motion
  • Poor posture

Poor posture and restricted motion are an indication of improper structural alignment of the body.

These physical problems often respond best to a physical form of treatment (such as Doctors Pain Relief Systems.)  Normal range of motion is necessary for proper circulation and repair of joints.  Restricted motion can come from a joint being out of its normal position, or from local tight or spastic muscles.

Prevention of arthritis would include:

  • Increasing range of motion and balancing posture
  • Getting better nutrition through better food choices
  • Exercise
  • Taking specific vitamin and mineral supplements

Supplements that have been shown to help are:

  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate repairs and rebuilds the protective cartilage in the joints
  • Vitamins A, C, E, and the mineral Selenium help to reduce “free-radicals” that can damage joint tissue
  • Omega-3 fatty acids can help the symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Proper eating can also have a hand in the prevention of, or relief from Arthritis pain.  Studies have shown that overweight people are more likely to develop Osteoarthritis.  For those people who are overweight, diet is a critical part of a complete program to become healthier.

Exercise also helps relieve Arthritic symptoms as it…

  • strengthens bones, muscles and joints
  • increases flexibility
  • prevents joint deformities
  • improves the immune system
  • reduces stress

Forms of exercise that have been shown to prevent or improve arthritis are:

  • walking
  • swimming
  • bicycling
  • water aerobics
  • strength training
  • stretching

In order to prevent, or reduce the pain of Arthritis, it is important to make sure that joints can properly function.

If you are ready to get control of your Arthritic pain before it totally consumes your life, then you’ve got to look into Doctor’s Pain Relief Systems.  This program is designed specifically for Arthritic conditions.  There are specific stretches and exercises within the system that can help you reduce your pain almost immediately.  I have also included many free bonuses as well.  Sign up for my free webinar to learn all about the system, and how the traditional ways of treatment just aren’t cutting it anymore.  Aren’t you tired of living on OTC medicines and prescription medicines?  Take back control of your body and your life!  Go to www.DoctorsPainReliefSystems.com right now and sign up for my free webinar!

 

To Your Health,

Dr Jason Hurst, DC, CCSP, CSCS

 

 

Sources:

  • Lewis, R. “Arthritis: Modern Treatment for That Old Pain in the Joints.” FDA Consumer 25:18-26, July/August 1991.
  • Ibid.
  • Theodosakis, J., Adderly, B. The Arthritis Cure 1997
  • “Joints Feel the Weight.” Prevention 41:10, February 1989.
  • Felson, D.T., “Obesity and Knee Osteoarthritis: The Framingham Study.” Annals of Internal Medicine 109:18-24, July 1, 1988.
  • Weiss, R. “Geneticists to Arthritics: A Gene’s the Rub.” Science News 138:148, 1990.
  • Arthritis Information: Rheumatoid Arthritis, op. cit.; Understanding Arthritis. Op. cit. pp. 126-133; Fries. op. cit., pp. 19-26; Vierck. Op. cit., pp. 17-21.
  • Bucci, L.R. Nutrition Applied to Injury Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1994, pp. 140-149.
  • Horstman, J. The Arthritis Foundation’s Guide to Alternative Therapies 1999
  • Chiropractic: The Right Choice (video), Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research 1995.
  • Berkson, D.L., Osteoarthritis, Chiropractic and Nutrition, Med Hypotheses 1991, Dec; 36(4):356-67. The Arthritis Foundation’s Guide to Alternative Therapies 1999, p. 45.