Do You Get Constipated?

What in the world does Constipation have to do with Back Pain?

Well, chronic constipation can cause all sorts of health complications, from hemorrhoids to fecal impaction to dull skin. Many people also experience related symptoms such as headaches and back pain, which accompany the constipation.

None of this is pleasant, but from the standpoint of detoxification, constipation is one of the largest barriers to the efficient elimination of accumulated toxins. If stool sits inside the colon too long without being eliminated, the toxins contained within may be circulated back into the blood. Furthermore, stools that are held up from being eliminated may generate even more toxins. The bacteria implicated in constipation emit their own wastes, which must be eliminated. With chronic constipation, good bacteria may die off as harmful bacteria flourishes and their toxins may damage the colon, causing further stagnancy.*

Constipation is not only uncomfortable, but also has long term damaging effects on the colon. One of the processes that happens in the colon is the extraction of water. The colon is constantly extracting water from it’s contents transforming the liquid wastes to solid. As a result, if elimination is not regular and complete, too much water is extracted causing the wastes to become too dry and then cemented to the walls of the colon.


 

 

 

 

 

Squatting toilet posture helps relieve and prevent constipation in four ways:

1. In the squatting position, gravity does most of the work. The weight of the torso presses against the thighs and naturally compresses the colon. Gentle pressure from the diaphragm supplements the force of gravity.

2. Squatting relaxes the puborectalis muscle, allowing the anorectal angle to straighten and the bowel to empty completely.

3. Squatting lifts the sigmoid colon to unlock the “kink” at the entrance to the rectum. This kink also helps prevent incontinence, by taking some of the pressure off the puborectalis muscle.

4. The colon is equipped with an inlet valve (the ileocecal valve) and an outlet valve (the puborectalis muscle). Squatting simultaneously closes the inlet valve, to keep the small intestine clean, and opens the outlet valve, to allow wastes to pass freely. The sitting position defeats the purpose of both valves, making elimination difficult and incomplete, and soiling the small intestine.

 

Let’s review the mechanics of going to the bathroom…

People can control when they defecate, to some extent, by contracting or releasing the anal sphincter. But that muscle can’t maintain continence on its own. The body also relies on a bend in the rectum (where feces is stored), and the anus (where feces comes out). When we’re standing or sitting the bend, called the anorectal angle, is kinked which puts upward pressure on the rectum and keeps the feces inside. The sitting posture actually keeps us in ‘continence mode’. This makes elimination difficult and incomplete, creating the need to STRAIN.

Optimal elimination is achieved in the natural squat position when the puborectalis muscle relaxes, allowing the anorectal angle to straighten, resulting in easier defecation.

There is a product that you can get for your home that is specifically designed to give you the correct posture when squatting.  If you’re tired of straining when you go, then this is a must have.  My patients absolutely love it.  I’ve actually gotten more information than I needed about how it’s helped them get “Regular” again.

Click on the image below to learn more…

 

Information collected from squattypotty.com

 

 

.

Dr Jason Hurst

Dr. Jason Hurst is the Founder and creator of the Doctor's Pain Relief Systems, a natural pain relief treatment to help you eliminate your pain naturally.

One Comment:

  1. Dr. Kyle Smith

    Dr. Hurst, Dr. Smith MD here. Just was reading through your content and website. My first visit of course. Great explanation on this subject. Many people don’t want to talk about such a sensitive subject as constipation. This leaves many people unwanted to seek treatment even because they are embarrassed. I believe your article does the topic justice to say the least. Nothing to be ashamed about here.

Comments are closed